Legislation

.

.

Councilman Curren Price is focused on making sure City Hall discusses and advances policy that serves the needs of our community. To that end, he will be working hard on various legislative actions, taking a lead on the issues that he knows will make the greatest impact to our residents, business owners and stakeholders.

The City Council regularly meets on Tuesday and Wednesdays at 10 a.m. In conformity with the Governor's Executive Order N-29-20 (March 17, 2020) and due to concerns over COVID-19, the City Council meeting will be conducted entirely telephonically. City Council meetings are broadcast LIVE on cable television Channel 35 and on the internet here. Live Council meetings can also be heard at: (213) 621-CITY (metro), (818) 904-9450 (valley), (310) 471-CITY (westside) AND (310) 547-CITY (San Pedro area).

Members of the public who wish to offer public comment to the Council should call (669) 254-5252 and  use Meeting ID No. 160 535 8466 and then press #. Press # again when prompted for participant ID. Once admitted into the meeting, press *9 to request to speak. Submit written comment at LACouncilComment.com

Below you can find summaries from "This Week in Council."

 

Wednesday, May 12

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a Transportation Committee Report relative to establishing a permanent Al Fresco Program in the City. The report asks the City Attorney and other City departments to report on the feasibility of reviving the Al Fresco Program. The Al Fresco Program became popular over the last year during the COVID-19 pandemic as it allowed restaurants to use the public right-of-way to serve diners in an outdoor setting. Read more here.

 

Tuesday, May 11

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council adopted an ordinance that amends the Los Angeles Municipal Code in various sections related to commercial cannabis businesses. Amongst the changes, cannabis businesses will now have an extended period of time for renewal applications submitted in 2019, 2020 and 2021 and now have until July 31, 2021 to submit renewal fees for those years due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Read more here.

Additionally, Councilmember Curren Price introduced a motion instructing the Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR), the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA), and the City Administrative Officer (CAO) to report on the feasibility of allocating a portion of the City’s Cannabis Tax Revenue to fund programs which serve communities that have been disproportionately harmed by the criminalization of cannabis. The goal of this motion is to place the City in a position to promote equity in the near future by reinvesting these dollars within underserved communities and those that have been negatively impacted by the years of criminalization of cannabis. The motion will be heard in the Budget and Finance committee within the next few months. Read the full motion here.

Councilmember Price also seconded a resolution supporting H.R. 1280 (Rep. Karen Bass) – George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2021. The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act would make systematic reforms to policing in the United States, including banning no-knock warrants and choke holds, dissolving qualified immunity from liability for peace officers, and encouraging significant reform to police training and policies. Read more here.

Finally, in the Economic Development and Jobs (EDJ) Committee, Councilmember Price heard a presentation on the benefits of creating a Public Bank within Los Angeles. The hearing in EDJ committee followed a motion put forward by former Council President Herb Wesson that instructed various City departments to look into establishing a Municipal Public Bank of Los Angeles following the passage of AB 857 – a state bill that created a framework that allowed municipalities to form public banks in the state. Public banks have many benefits including providing a significant number of Angelenos who have unbanked access to a checking or savings account. Read more here.

 

Wednesday, May 5

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a motion from the Planning and Land Use Management Committee (PLUM) relative to the feasibility of permitting the conversion of commercial hotels into the micro-unit housing. The report is based on a motion that cites the need for any and all solutions for housing within Los Angeles as the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the need due to the number of jobs lost. The report asks various City departments, including the Planning Department, Department of Building and Safety, and others to prepare a report outlining options on how to move forward with converting commercial hotels into micro-unit housing. Click here to read more.

Additionally, the City Council approved a Public Works Committee report relative to the installation of the Venice Mexican American Traqueros Monument. The monument will serve as a reminder of how Los Angeles was built with the sweat and toil of immigrant workers and honor their contributions. The proposed monument is supported by many across the City and the Country, including labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta. The monument will be located in Windward Circle in the Venice neighborhood. Click here for more.

Finally, the Council’s Budget and Finance Committee continued to hear presentations from various City departments related to budget requests. Councilman Price continues to have a keen focus on seeking solutions and addressing generations of damage caused by long-standing effects of inequality, racial and social injustices. Budget deliberations will continue through next week before being presented to the full City Council on May 20. If approved, the budget will take effect during the new fiscal year beginning on July 1.  

 

Tuesday, May 4

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a Public Safety Committee report asking the LAPD, with assistance of the City Attorney, to disclose a detailed account based on the increased hate crime targeting Asian Americans in the City and on the LAPD’s response to the troubling trend. Over the last year, there has been an increase in reported crimes against the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community sparked by racist rhetoric used by several politicians and news outlets. The goal with this information is to make it easier for those in the AAPI community to gather data on these crimes and incidents, and make communities safer. Read more here.

 

Tuesday, April 27

This week, the Los Angeles City Council’s Budget and Finance Committee, which Councilmember Curren Price sits on, began hearing presentations from various City departments regarding Mayor Eric Garcetti’s $11 billion proposed budget for the 2021-2022 Fiscal Year.

Within the initial plan, the Mayor allocates nearly $1 billion to combat homelessness and more than $300 million in equity and justice initiatives like a citywide Guaranteed Basic Income (GBI) program. Earlier this year, Councilman Price announced an initial $6 million towards a targeted GBI for single parents and caregivers in the District. Furthermore, in the proposed City budget there is dedicated funding for direct relief to small businesses in low-income communities, expanding the Gang Reduction and Youth Development (GRYD) program and eviction defense. 

Councilman Price looks to build upon the work he did on the Budget Committee last year with reinvesting $150 million from the LAPD budget into Black and Brown communities in Los Angeles. 

Budget deliberations will continue through the coming week before being presented to the full City Council on May 20. If approved, the budget will take effect during the new Fiscal Year beginning July 1.

 

Wednesday, April 14

On Wednesday, Councilmember Curren Price seconded a motion presented by Council President Nury Martinez that focuses on transitioning the City of Los Angeles from COVID-19 response to COVID-19 recovery. The Council will consider using the $1.35 billion the City will receive from the federal American Rescue Plan.

Within the recovery plan, the Council is being urged to prioritize focusing on supporting children and families, including supporting moms with child care and family care; supporting women entrepreneurs and women-led organizations; opportunities for youth employment; and continuing efforts related to providing a Universal Basic Income to all Angelenos.

The motion cites the need to shift the focus of the City from COVID-19 response to COVID-19 recovery as the City Council created the Ad Hoc Committee on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment, a committee Councilman Price sits on, which has provided Angelenos rent relief, utility relief, and child care. As vaccination rates increase and cases continue to decrease, the Council is being called on to prioritize those who have been impacted the most during the pandemic, like those who are Black, Latinx, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, and low-income populations. The COVID-19 pandemic will have an impact on the City of Los Angeles for decades to come, and with this new plan, the Council hopes to lead Los Angeles into a stronger future. To read the full list of priorities and the full motion, click here

 

Tuesday, April 6

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a Homelessness and Poverty Committee Report related to a motion, co-introduced by Councilmember Curren Price, instructing the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA), with assistance from the Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) and the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) to develop a citywide framework on how its existing outreach teams and new outreach teams will coordinate to ensure a person experiencing homelessness has the best chance of a successful housing placement. The motion also lists many objectives including how these teams will address homelessness during “off-hours,” which are defined as a night, weekend, or emergency outside of normal service times. The motion was brought forward after subsequent motions and presentations brought to light existing gaps between how homelessness outreach was being conducted between the City and County. Click here to read the full motion.

 

Wednesday, April 7

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a Public Safety Committee Report to rename the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) Central Area Roll Call Room as the Robert William Stewart Roll Call Room. Stewart was the first African American to serve in the LAPD. The report is based on a motion co-authored by Councilmember Price. Stewart was pushed from the department in 1900 based on false allegations against him. Click here for more.  

Additionally, the City Council approved an additional Public Safety Report relative to the resources needed to expand the LAPD’s Mental Evaluation Unit (MEU) and System-wide Mental Assessment Response Teams (SMART). The report asks the LAPD to report back on the resources needed to expand the LAPD’s MEU and SMART to ensure that police officers in the field can rely on SMART or other MEU resources anytime there may be a need. Click here for more.

Wednesday, March 24

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council voted to approve a motion introduced by Councilmember Price asking the Information Technology Agency (ITA) to add multiple languages, including Spanish, to the MYLA311 mobile application. The addition will be a tremendous help to District 9 as many constituents speak Spanish as their first language.  

For the first time, neighbors would be able to submit requests for bulky item pickup, graffiti removal, sidewalk repair, street sweeping and dozens of other City services in a language other than English. The new and improved MYLA311 mobile application will also include the capabilities of submitting requests in Chinese, Tagalog and Korean. The updated app and website is expected to be revamped by the end of 2021. Click here for more.

 

Tuesday, March 23

On Tuesday, the Economic Development and Jobs Committee (EDJ), chaired by Councilmember Curren Price, approved a motion that would put a moratorium on issuing fines to any street vendors for not having a permit. Vendors may still be fined for not complying with other rules and regulations, for example blocking entrances, sidewalks and ADA access. Councilmember Price asked StreetsLA to study how LA County has handled street vending and report back on progress with the County in terms of trying to create a more fair and equitable program that allows more vendors to participate. The item will now move to the full City Council for a final vote. Click here for more.

Additionally, Councilmember Price co-introduced a motion instructing the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA) with assistance from the Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) and the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) to develop a citywide framework on how its existing outreach teams and new outreach teams will coordinate to ensure a person experiencing homelessness has the best chance of a successful housing placement. The motion also lists many objectives including how these teams will address homelessness during “off-hours,” which are defined as a night, weekend or emergency outside of normal service times. The motion was brought forward after subsequent motions and presentations brought to light existing gaps between how homelessness outreach was being conducted between the City and County. Click here to read the full motion.

 

Wednesday, March 17

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a Housing Committee report relative to a motion that explores implementing an immediate rent freeze on residential units with expired or expiring affordability covenants and relocation options for impacted tenants. The report also asks to explore options to preserve long-term affordable housing stock. With the COVID-19 pandemic, many residents within Los Angeles have experienced economic hardships forcing them to choose between paying rent and paying for other necessities. The goal of this motion is to keep Angelenos housed and help ease the economic burden. Click here for more.

Further, the Council asked the City Attorney, with help from the Small Business Commission, to draft a Foodware Accessories Upon Request ordinance that would require restaurants and other food service providers to provide all disposable foodware accessories (straws, utensils, condiments, napkins, etc.) only upon the request of the customer. The ordinance also will require third party food delivery companies and other online platforms for ordering prepared meals to enact an opt-in model for foodware accessories across all digital platforms and applications. With the COVID-19 pandemic increasing the reliance on food delivery and takeout, the goal of the ordinance is to cut back on the amount of plastic waste that clogs landfills, pollutes streets and waterways, and adds to the global gut of non-recyclable plastic pollution. Click here for the full motion.

Additionally, the City Council approved a Homelessness and Poverty Committee report relative to a motion that asks the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA) to report in 14 days on ways the City of Los Angeles Emergency Management Department can align with the Los Angeles County Office of Emergency Management to better support Winter Shelter Program sites for those experiencing homelessness. The report also asks for the Winter Shelter Program to be extended beyond March 31, 2021. Click here for more.

Finally, the City Council went on to approve three Homelessness and Poverty Committee reports relative to the Homeless Housing and Recovery Program focused on housing and options for housing that support substance abuse recovery; a report relative to the development of metrics to determine the suitability of hotels and motels for temporary and permanent homeless housing; and a report that develops a new set of design standards to facilitate the construction of temporary housing units. All reports and the related motions aim to continue to provide resources and housing for those experiencing homelessness within Los Angeles. Click here, here, and here for more.

 

Tuesday, March 16

On Tuesday, Councilmember Curren Price introduced a motion with Councilmembers Nithya Raman and Gil Cedillo asking StreetsLA and the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) to re-establish a moratorium on enforcing and issuing citations to street vendors who do not have a valid license or permit for the remainder of the COVID-19 pandemic and for six months after the emergency ends. During the six-month period following the end of the emergency order, StreetsLA will conduct an extensive education and outreach campaign to the vendors to ensure they get the proper information on how to obtain a permit.  

With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic and simultaneous closures of the vast majority of businesses across Los Angeles, the City Council adopted a motion in March 2020 to resume enforcement of unpermitted street vendors during the emergency period in order to limit the virus’ spread. However, as the emergency period has continued, many forms of retail and dining have been allowed to reopen. With only approximately 90 vendors out of more than 10,000 in Los Angeles County that have obtained permits, the goal of this motion is to continue to keep street vendors a vital part of Los Angeles as they have for several decades. Click here for the full motion.

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a report from the Immigrant Affairs, Civil Right, and Equity Committee instructing the Personnel Department, with the assistance of the Human Relations Commission and the Commission on the Status of Women, to develop a strategic plan with goals to better recruit, hire, develop and retain women in departments across the City, including women of color, transgender women and non-binary individuals. This action follows from the publication of a report by Los Angeles City Controller Ron Galperin. Within the report, Galperin notes that while the City of Los Angeles does a better job with gender equity compared to other jurisdictions, the City can do more. The report highlights that only 28 percent of the City’s workforce is represented by women – the same percentage as in 2015. The plan aims to close the gender gap amongst the City’s workforce in both representation and pay. Click here for more.

 

Wednesday, March 3

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council finalized a “hazard pay” emergency ordinance by a vote of 14-1 that will provide roughly 26,000 grocery store and drugstore workers an additional $5 an hour for 120 days. The temporary mandate, which Councilman Price co-presented, applies to stores with 10 or more employees onsite and 300 or more employees nationwide. Click here for more.

Additionally, the City Council approved a Public Safety Committee report relative to a motion that instructs the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) to report in 30 days on the current race/ethnicity and gender demographics of sworn personnel in the LAPD as compared to 10 years ago, and present a forecast as to where the LAPD expects to be in the next five years in regards to race/ethnicity and gender demographics within the department. Click here for more.

 

Tuesday, March 2

Councilmember Curren Price Puts in Motion Plan to Develop Largest Guaranteed Basic Income Program in the Country  

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council voted in support of overriding Mayor Eric Garcetti’s veto of a community reinvestment proposal, clearing the way for the reallocation of $88 million from the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) towards initiatives that reimagine public safety and support disenfranchised communities of color.

Councilmember Curren Price outlined a number of crucial initiatives for his District, including  $6 million for a Guaranteed Basic Income Pilot Program, the largest program of its kind in the country. The CD 9 Guaranteed Basic Income initiative would provide 500 single-parent households $1,000 a month for a year. Other programs will include an unarmed model of crisis response, community intervention workers, homelessness prevention, and other services that address economic inequality and prevent poverty. Click here for more.

Additionally, the City Council approved two motions to provide assistance to renters within the City of Los Angeles. The first motion, seconded by Councilmember Price, asks the Los Angeles Housing + Community Investment Department (HCIDLA) on the feasibility of creating a Renters Relief Registry, which would provide renters with monetary aid to help individuals meet their needs. Click here for more. The second motion authorizes HCIDLA to create an Emergency Renters Assistance Subsidy Program (ERAP) to assist tenants and small landlords. ERAP will be funded by state funds and will total $143 million to help Angelenos with rent. Click here for more. 

Finally, the City Council approved a motion by Councilmember Price to begin new construction of a 127-unit multifamily housing project that will be known as Parkview within Council District 9 on Compton Avenue. The project will have 126 units of affordable housing and one manager’s unit for those in CD 9. Click here for more.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 24

On Wednesday, the City Council approved a “hazard pay” emergency ordinance by a vote of 14-1 that would provide roughly 26,000 grocery store and drugstore workers an additional $5 an hour for 120 days. The temporary mandate, which will come back next week for a second reading, would apply to stores with 10 or more employees onsite and 300 or more employees nationwide. Councilmember Price, who is Chair of the Economic Development and Jobs Committee (EDJ), co-presented the proposal in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Click here to read the ordinance.

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council adopted an ordinance to institute a Paid Parental Time (PPT) pilot program that will provide up to six weeks of 100 percent paid time off for City employees who are new parents. The pilot program will run through June 30, 2025. The goal of the program is to ease the burden on new mothers and not force them to decide between work and taking care of their child. Click here to read the full ordinance. 

Further, the City Council approved an EDJ Committee Report to help address federal assistance gaps and resources for undocumented people. The report instructs the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA), with the assistance of the Los Angeles Housing and Community Investment Department (HCIDLA), the Economic and Workforce Development Department and other City departments, to report with recommendations on methods to improve the City’s outreach efforts for undocumented immigrants focused on increased participation of undocumented immigrants in the City’s programs and services. Click here for more.

The City Council also approved a report from the Housing Committee and Budget and Finance Committee to ask for an analysis on the feasibility of a revolving loan fund that would increase the stock of workforce housing in the City to benefit working families and promote regional economic growth and job creation. The report asks the CLA to work with HCIDLA to draft a report on best practices in creating a fund by working with institutional investors, philanthropic organizations and private companies. Click here for more.

Finally, the City Council approved a report relative to a motion that instructs the CLA, CAO, the Department of General Services and other City departments, to report on the underutilization of city-owned properties and the feasibility of using them for temporary or permanent homeless housing. For more info, click here.

 

Tuesday, Feb. 23

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a report relative to finding alternative methods that do not rely on armed law enforcement when conducting traffic enforcement within Los Angeles. The report was relative to a motion co-introduced by Councilmember Curren Price that asks various departments, including the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) and the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD), to evaluate alternatives. Click here for more.

Additionally, the City Council heard an oral presentation from the Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) and the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA) in regards to the development of an unarmed model of crisis response to divert non-violent calls for service away from the LAPD and to the appropriate non-law enforcement agencies. Within this discussion, Councilmember Price asked for the CAO to expand on how they are gathering data and stakeholder input to make sure that conversations held last summer through virtual town halls within our community are not forgotten about and the best program is put forward. The conversation is one of many that will continue to occur as the City Council pursues a re-imagined public safety system within the City of Los Angeles. For background information, click here

 

Wednesday, Feb. 17

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a Public Safety Committee report relative to a proposed Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the LAPD and HACLA in connection to the CSP program. Within MOA, two public housing developments, Avalon Gardens and Pueblo del Rio, in Council District 9 were included. Click here for more.

The City Council also considered a motion that would make it easier for the City to issue permits for Safe Parking projects and make administrative changes to remove unnecessary hurdles to expedite facilities to serve persons experiencing homelessness. Click here for the full motion.

Lastly, the City Council approved a Public Safety Committee report requesting the LAPD to report on how they plan on addressing the significant increases in violent crimes across the City. In comparison to this time last year, violent crime is up significantly and is comparable to rates last seen in the City in the 1980s and 1990s. Click here for the motion. 

 

 

Tuesday, Feb. 16 

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council considered motions and reports aimed at bridging the digital divide, providing more help to renters and low-income families and examining practices of the City Council to make work more transparent.

The City Council approved a report from the Information, Technology, and General Services Committee relative to a motion that explored the feasibility of creating a Digital Equity Plan within the City. The motion, seconded by Councilmember Curren Price, instructs the City Administrative Officer (CAO) and Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA) to report on best practices, as well as funding sources, that can be used by the City to ensure that all families within Los Angeles have access to the Internet going forward. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been numerous reports of low-income students being left behind while in school because of the lack of access to the Internet. The motion aims to fix this divide. Read the full motion here.

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a Public Safety report related to a motion that asks the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) on the expectations for officers assigned to community-focused duties, and how their performance is measured. The motion asks the LAPD to report in 30 days on community expectations for officers assigned as Senior Lead Officers within the Community Safety Partnership Bureau. Click here for more. 

Further, the Los Angeles City Council considered the feasibility of amending the City of Los Angeles’ zoning code through a ballot initiative to ensure a more equitable distribution of new housing around the City based on high quality jobs, transit and historic housing production. A report is expected from the City Planning Department and CLA in 30 days. Click here for more.

Along the same line, the City Council discussed creating criteria for amending the City’s planning process to have high value developments bypass the Planning and Land Use Management (PLUM) Committee and go straight to the full Council. The proposal was suggested due to previous members of the City Council’s abuse of the current guidelines. The Council plans to revisit this proposal after the City Planning Department and the CLA report back in 30 days. Click here for more.

Finally, the Los Angeles City Council approved Housing Committee reports for proposals to help low-income residents with rent and ultimately to keep them housed. The first report asks the City’s Planning Department to report on the creation of an incentive program that allows developers to contribute funds to provide rental assistance for low-income residents, such as the Renters Assistance Program. The second report is related to the creation of a strategy to support and expand the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA) housing acquisition program to increase the number of publicly owned housing units to keep low-income families housed. Click here and here for the reports and motions.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 10

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved an ordinance that allows commercial cannabis licensees to provide late payments of renewal fees to match the City’s ongoing fiscal crisis.

The ordinance extends the 10-day payment deadline to 30 days, adds alternative methods of payment – such as by mail – and establishes one-time extensions for the late submission of 2020 and/or 2021 renewal applications and late payments of 2020 and/or 2021 renewal fees due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The ordinance was drafted following a motion introduced by Councilmember Curren Price at the end of January in response to the Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR) and Office of Finance temporary closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Click here to read the full ordinance.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 3

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved motions related to COVID-19, reimagining public safety, street improvements and a reward motion. 

Councilmember Price seconded a motion exploring the feasibility of creating a Public Health Department within the City of Los Angeles. The need for a health department stems from the lack of control the City of LA has with how resources like PPE, testing sites and now vaccine sites are distributed across the City due to relying on the LA County Department of Public Health. By creating a new Public Health Department, the City would have more independence on how resources could be distributed during the COVID-19 pandemic and with any other public health crisis in the future. Click here to read the full motion.

Additionally, Councilmember Price seconded a motion that asks for a status update on a Request for Proposal (RFP) to select a nonprofit that will help run the City of Los Angeles’ Unarmed Responder Pilot Program, and report on efforts to maximize efficient rollout of the program. The status update follows after the City Council introduced a motion, co-authored by Councilmember Price, to call on City Departments to report on establishing an unarmed responder program in the City of Los Angeles, which would direct non-violent 911 calls to health professionals and crisis interventionists rather than armed LAPD officers. Click here for the full motion.

Finally, the City Council approved two motions authored by Councilmember Price focused on street improvements on Main Street and a reward motion for information leading to the identification, apprehension and conviction of the person(s) responsible for the shooting death of Pearl Myles on Oct. 1, 2020. 

The motion for street improvements on Main Street allocates $450,000 for street resurfacing and improvements to curbs to make them ADA compliant. Click here for the motion.

The reward motion for information regarding the shooting death of Ms. Myles offers $50,000 to help identify the person or persons responsible for the 79-year-old’s death. The reward will be offered for six months until August 2021. If you have information regarding the death of Ms. Myles, please contact (877) 275-5273. Click here for full motion. 

 

Tuesday, Feb. 2

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council unanimously approved a proposal, co-presented by Councilmember Curren Price, which would give employees at grocery and drugstores with 300 or more employees nationally, as well as retail stores with 85,000 square feet or more that dedicate 10 percent of sales floor to grocery or drug retail, an additional $5 an hour hazard pay for 120 days. The proposed plan also asks the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA) to report on the feasibility of including other low-wage frontline workers within sectors like healthcare, transportation, goods movement/logistics, janitorial services and delivery services. The Council is expected to vote on the final emergency ordinance later this month. 

Added Councilman Price, “This is personal for me and a thank you just isn’t enough. Communities of color like the one I represent are primarily composed of essential workers who do not have the luxury of staying home and are backed into corners daily where they can’t always follow health protocols due to their nature of their jobs. These workers are in danger now, they need hazard pay now – I only wish we could have provided it to them sooner.”

Click here to read the motion. 

 

Wednesday, Jan. 27

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved two motions seconded by Councilmember Price that focus on an equitable distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine to some of the most vulnerable residents within Los Angeles. The motions ask various departments, including the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health and Emergency Management Department, to create proposals and report to the City Council on how to best prioritize low-income communities of color and frontline workers who have been hit hardest by the pandemic. City departments, including the General Services Department and the Department of Recreation and Parks, are also being asked to explore ways to use existing infrastructures to serve as vaccine distribution centers in higher risk communities. To read the motion regarding the equitable distribution of vaccines, click here. To read the motion instructing various City departments to explore ways to use existing infrastructure as vaccine distribution centers, click here.

Additionally, the City Council heard a presentation from  Los Angeles County Department of Public Health Director Dr. Barbara Ferrer on the state of the COVID-19 pandemic countywide. She emphasized the importance of continuing to wear masks and be as vigilant as possible with observing social distancing guidelines. She along with the Los Angeles Fire Department Chief Ralph Terrazas expressed optimism that as vaccine supply increases, more vaccine sites within South LA will be opening and mobile vaccine units will become available focusing on COVID hotspots similar to how mobile testing units currently operate. 

The Council also approved a report from the Planning and Land Use Management Committee report relative to a motion presented by Councilmember Price that allows commercial cannabis businesses to provide late payments of renewal fees due to the City’s ongoing fiscal crisis. The motion asks the City Attorney, with the assistance of the Department of Cannabis Regulation (DCR), to present an ordinance that allows commercial cannabis licensees to provide late payments of renewal fees to match the City’s ongoing fiscal crisis and the Office of Finance’s operational changes. Click here for the full motion.

Finally, Councilmember Price introduced a motion asking the Information Technology Agency (ITA) and other departments as necessary to evaluate the feasibility of adding additional languages, like Spanish, to the MyLA311 mobile app, which allows residents to submit requests for bulky item pickup, graffiti removal and illegal dumping pickup among other services, and the Get Connected Los Angeles website. The goal of the motion is to make both of these City services more accessible for residents within Los Angeles as 43 percent of the County of Los Angeles is Spanish speaking. Click here to read more.

 

Tuesday, Jan. 26

On Tuesday, the Economic Development and Jobs (EDJ) Committee, which Councilmember Curren Price chairs, voted unanimously to have the City Attorney draft an emergency ordinance that would provide hourly, non-managerial employees at grocery and drug retail stores in the City with 10 or more employees onsite and 300 or more employees nationally, with an additional $5 an hour hazard pay for 120 days, as compensation due to the high risk nature of doing their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic.

The committee report is expected to be in Council next week and the ordinance and reports transmitted later this month. The final ordinance could be approved before the end of February. Click here to read the full motion, which was co-presented by Councilmember Price. 

 

Tuesday, Jan. 19

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved various motions related to police training standards within the LAPD, homelessness and the COVID-19 pandemic.

The City Council approved a report from the Ad Hoc Committee on Police Reform relative to a motion introduced by Councilmember Curren Price that directs the LAPD to report on various practices and training methods within their department. The LAPD is asked to produce a plan to enhance community policing and procedural justice training standards within the department. The procedures include the duty to intercede, crisis intervention and de-escalation tactics used by officers. The motion was introduced following the nationwide peaceful protests last summer after George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, was killed while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Click here to read more.

Additionally, the City Council approved a report from the Homelessness and Poverty Committee relative to the use of the Los Angeles Convention Center as a temporary emergency homeless shelter. The motion, introduced by Councilman Price, instructs the City Administrative Officer (CAO), the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA), the Convention and Tourism Department, and other departments as necessary, to evaluate the use of the Convention Center as a temporary emergency homeless shelter and report back to Council in 30 days.

Within the report, the departments are asked to explore all potential uses for the property – including expanding the parking structures into safe parking sites, the potential of adding temporary shelter like pallet structures, and using the interior of the Convention Center as a temporary shelter. Click here for the full motion. 

Finally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a report, as well as a motion to provide funding for COVID-19 awareness within Council District 9 and funding for A Bridge Housing project also in the District. To read more click here and here.

 

Wednesday, Jan. 13

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a Health, Education, Neighborhoods, Parks, Arts, and River Committee report requesting the City Attorney to draft an ordinance that would provide fines and penalties for refusal to wear a mask at an indoor public place when requested to do so by management or operators of a facility or establishment. Additionally, the Council requested the ordinance to prioritize the issuance of citations, during the normal course of business, to persons not wearing a mask in public and report in 30 days on the status of the new ordinance. As COVID-19 continues to spread rapidly, the goal of the ordinance is to help encourage individuals to wear a mask and avoid citations and fines to help stop the spread of the disease. Click here for more. 

 

Tuesday, Jan. 12

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council returned following a brief recess for the holidays for the first City Council meeting of 2021. During this meeting, the City Council considered initiatives focused on renters’ relief, housing and condemning the deplorable actions that took place last week in our U.S. Capitol.  

Councilmember Curren Price seconded a motion that calls on the City Council to build 25,000 housing units by 2025 in an effort to house homeless individuals within the City. Based on a report by LAHSA issued in March 2020, the 25,000 units will help get us closer than ever to ending homelessness in Los Angeles once and for all. Click here for more. To help reach this goal, Councilmember Price also signed onto a motion that will help streamline the process in the creation of new housing by asking various City departments to form pre-approved plans that are free for the most common building types within the City. The objective is to reduce both the costs and time associated with projects that sometimes take years to complete. Click here for more.

In addition, Councilmember Price joined colleagues in backing a motion to establish a “Renters Relief Registry” that would benefit the most vulnerable renters when economic aid becomes available that addresses both the pandemic and institutional poverty. Renters will be prioritized based on a list of criteria, which will include those who are essential workers, and those households with children living below the poverty line, for example. Click here for more.

Further, the City Council approved a Housing Committee report securing millions of dollars for various improvements within Council District 9. Recipients of the funding include All Peoples Community Center, Green Meadows Recreation Center, the Hoover-Gage Park Playground, the Theresa Lindsay Multipurpose Center and funding for “Ways Park,” a new park installation. Click here for more.

Finally, Councilmember Price supported a resolution calling on Vice President Mike Pence and the President’s Cabinet to use the 25th Amendment to declare President Donald Trump unfit to fulfill his duties as the commander-in-chief. The resolution also promotes legislation that would begin impeachment proceedings to remove President Trump from office. Click here for more.

 

Tuesday, Dec. 15

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a motion by Councilmember Curren Price that instructs the Department of General Services to initiate a lease agreement between the City of Los Angeles and the Coalition for Responsible Community Development (CRCD), which provides a number of youth development and workforce development services, as well as the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights (CHIRLA), a non-profit organization that represents and advocates for the interests of the immigrant and refugee community, to lease the Old Junipero Serra Library over 25 years. Both CRCD and CHIRLA have run out of space at their current locations and the underutilized space in District 9 will provide the necessary room for these groups to continue to provide services to the local community. Click here for more. 

Additionally, the City Council approved motions introduced by Councilmember Price that allocate funding for infrastructure improvements within CD 9, including trash and bulky-item pickup and sidewalk repairs. To read more, click here and here.  

The City Council also approved a report from the Economic Development Committee to establish standards for third party automated employment selections tools to promote equitable hiring across race, ethnicity and gender. This report follows a motion, seconded by Councilmember Price, that claims a majority of employers use pre-hire tests or assessments for sorting applicants. These assessments have been found to be discriminatory against Black and Brown applicants, which have disproportionately been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The goal of the motion is to equal the playing field in the hiring and rehiring process. Click here for more.  

Further, the City Council adopted a motion, co-presented by Councilmember Price, that instructs the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA) and the Economic & Workforce Development Department (EWDD) to develop a multi-tiered and multilingual technical assistance business assistance program that follows numerous recommendations, including providing services and benefits most beneficial to struggling small, local businesses within the City with a focus on restaurants and boutique shops. The motion was introduced as a majority of brick-and-mortar businesses have had to shift their business model online during the COVID-19 pandemic but have been provided little guidance on how to maximize this shift. Click here for more.  

With the news of COVID-19 vaccine distributions which started in early December, the City Council adopted a resolution urging Gov. Gavin Newsom, the California Department of Public Health, and other state officials, to prioritize the recovery of the public education system by providing teachers and school support staff with vaccines immediately after health care professionals in order to safely reopen schools and get students back into the classroom as soon as possible. To read more click here. 

Councilmember Price along with five other members introduced a motion instructing the City Attorney to draft an emergency ordinance that would provide all on-site grocery workers at grocery stores with 300 or more employees with an additional $5 per hour in wages during which the City of Los Angeles is within a widespread (purple), substantial (red), or moderate (orange) risk level of COVID-19 case spread. If the ordinance is adopted, the $5 increase will last until risk levels return to minimal (yellow). Click here to read the full motion.

Finally, the Los Angeles City Council re-elected Councilwoman Nury Martinez as the Council President and Councilmember Joe Buscaino as the President Pro Tempore. Council President Martinez is entering her second year as Council President. She is the first Latina in the Los Angeles City Council’s history to hold this position.

 

Wednesday, Dec. 9

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a report from the CAO to extend Project Roomkey through March 2021. Project Roomkey is an agreement between the City and County of Los Angeles to secure hotel and motel rooms for people experiencing homelessness in order to reduce the risk to this population of contracting COVID-19 by providing safe spaces to quarantine. The extension will grant more than $9 million of State of California Homeless Housing, Assistance, and Prevention Program (HHAP) funding. Click here for more.

Additionally, Councilmember Price introduced a series of motions to allocate funding for infrastructure improvements within CD 9, including trash and bulky-item pickup, and sidewalk repairs. To read more click here and here

 

Tuesday, Dec. 8

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved the Budget and Finance Committee report relative to the Second Financial Status Report for Fiscal Year 2020-2021 from the City Administrative Officer (CAO). The report was presented to the City Council as the City of Los Angeles faces a  $675 million deficit caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Within the report, recommendations were provided on how to close the budget shortfalls. Some of the options that were recommended included taking money from current City reserves, to borrowing money from the state and federal government, to eliminating positions in various departments through layoffs. Councilmember Curren Price introduced an amending motion instructing the CAO to report back on any unused funds following the Dec. 30 deadline at the end of the month to determine the City’s next steps. To read more click here.

Additionally, Councilmember Price introduced a motion instructing the Department of General Services to initiate a lease agreement between the City of Los Angeles and the Coalition for Responsible Community Development (CRCD), which provides a number of youth development and workforce development services, as well as the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights (CHIRLA), a non-profit organization that represents and advocates for the interests of the immigrant and refugee community, to lease the Old Junipero Serra Library over 25 years. Both CRCD and CHIRLA have run out of space at their current locations and the underutilized space in District 9 will provide additional space for these groups to continue to provide services to the local community. Click here for more.

 

Wednesday, Dec. 2

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a report from the Ad Hoc on Comprehensive Job Creation Plan Committee to develop recommendations for a new comprehensive jobs plan for the City. The report was based on a motion which was co-introduced by Councilmember Curren Price. The motion calls for the City’s job plan to evolve in the same way that the economy has evolved because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The motion stresses the need for an updated plan as Los Angeles has seen an increase in unemployment by roughly 50 percent over the last several months due to how harsh the coronavirus pandemic has been on the City’s economy. The motion lists several recommendations, including evaluating where the major employment gaps exist currently and how the City can subsidize or support job preparation in those positions. Click here for more.

Additionally, the City Council approved a motion to authorize more than $2 million of Coronavirus Relief Funds to the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) to implement the Winter Shelter Program through March 2021. The program will provide shelter for those experiencing homelessness during the winter months and into the spring of next year. Click here for more. 

 

Tuesday, Dec. 1

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a Housing Committee report that requests the City Attorney, in consultation with the Los Angeles Housing + Community Investment Department (HCIDLA) to draft an ordinance related to an implementation of a citywide Tenant Anti-Harassment Program. The aim of the ordinance is to protect renters within Los Angeles and provide remedies for those who have been badgered by landlords during the COVID-19 pandemic. Within the ordinance, there will be a comprehensive list of what defines harassment and solutions for renters if they experience it. Click here for more.

 

Tuesday, Nov. 24

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved reports from the Ad Hoc on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment Committee to provide funding for safe-parking sites and to continue the Senior Meal Emergency Response Program until the end of 2020. Councilman Curren Price secured funding to turn the parking lot of his District Office into a safe-parking site for homeless individuals beginning in January 2021. Click here and here for more. 

Additionally, the City Council continued discussion on a motion proposed by Councilmember Bob Blumenfield and seconded by Councilmember Curren Price that seeks to amend Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC) Section 41.18 and 56.11. These amendments aim to ban sleeping, sitting, or lying near freeway overpasses and entrances, as well as determine how the City is able to handle bulky items and conduct CARE+ cleanups. During the meeting, Councilmember Price expressed that he wanted to find solutions and help individuals get housed. He also mentioned that within Council District 9, there are 2,000 units of Affordable and Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) in the pipeline that are scheduled to be completed within the next two to three years. Within those units, approximately 900 are designated for people experiencing homelessness. The draft ordinance was sent back for further discussion and review in the City Council's Homelessness and Poverty Committee. Click here to read more.

 

Tuesday, Nov. 10

On Tuesday, Councilmember Curren Price alongside Councilmembers Kevin de León and Gilbert Cedillo introduced a motion to have the Los Angeles Convention Center in District 9 evaluated for possible use as a temporary emergency homeless shelter. With cold winter temperatures and rain in the foreseeable future and with Los Angeles continuing to see an upward trend in homelessness, the need for a substantial solution to bring individuals inside is crucial.

The idea to use the City facility for emergency purposes is not unprecedented. Last April, with the onset of COVID-19, a portion of the Los Angeles Convention Center was transformed into a temporary medical facility to handle the overflow of recovering COVID-19 patients from local hospitals.

“In the midst of the pandemic, we must take bold, dramatic action and do everything possible to ensure the safety of our communities,” added Councilmember Price, who represents District 9 where the Convention Center is located. “At this moment in time, we are being hard pressed to think outside-the-box, come up with a variety of solutions and look for ways to use existing resources that are underutilized at a fraction of the cost. The Convention Center offers just that - an incredible opportunity to assist the unhoused.”

Tuesday’s action instructs various departments to study the proposal and come up with recommendations within the next 30 days. Read more here.

 

Wednesday, Nov. 4

On Wednesday, the LA City Council voted unanimously to authorize businesses the right to refuse service and admittance to customers who choose to not wear a face covering. The ordinance will automatically expire when the city’s coronavirus declaration of emergency is lifted. For more information on this ordinance, click here

 

Wednesday, Oct. 28

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council considered an ordinance that would have prohibited homeless encampments in close proximity to freeways, tunnels, homeless facilities and in such cases where personal property obstructs the public right-of-way as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Councilmember Price, who seconded the motion, advocated for this ordinance as he and other members on the Council believed it would help get unhoused individuals into shelter and help keep their communities clean and safe for their constituents. Within the discussion, various issues were raised including how the ordinance would be enforced and how the City would track who was offered shelter. Several members argued that in order for the ordinance to be effective that these issues need to be flushed out.  Because of this, the City Council decided to table the item for further discussion and potential vote on Nov. 24 in an effort for members to come to a consensus on how to best proceed. Click here to read the full draft ordinance. 

Councilmember Curren Price along with several other members introduced a resolution denouncing the Trump administration’s “Zero Tolerance Policy” after a report revealed that 545 children who were separated from their families have not been reunited with their families. The resolution calls on Congress and the Office of the President to enact legislation to ensure that no other child will ever be separated from their parents as they seek to enter the United States through asylum or any other means. To read the full resolution click here.

 

Tuesday, Oct. 27

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a report from the Ad Hoc Committee on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment authorizing $50 million of Federal Coronavirus Relief Funds to be used to fund the COVID-19 Utility Grant Program. The utility relief program will be administered in partnership with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP). City of Los Angeles’ residents who are DWP customers making 50 percent Area Median Income (AMI) or lower will be eligible to receive $500 to assist with utility costs, including: gas service, cellular phone, Wi-Fi, and Internet/cable services. The program is expected to serve up to 100,000 households and will prioritize those already enrolled in the LADWP’s low-income assistance program. Councilmember Curren Price seconded Council President Nury Martinez’ motion and is a member of the Ad Hoc Committee. Click here for more information on the grant program. Please note that applications for the $500 grant will be accepted online through LADWP’s MyAccount customer portal between Nov. 2–15, and will be distributed via check mailed to the eligible customer in late December. If the number of eligible applicants exceeds the available funding, awardees will be selected randomly, with priority given to existing LADWP assistance program participants.

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council adopted a motion for the City to re-apply for grant funding for the City’s Low Income Purchase Assistance (LIPA) Program to assist first-time homebuyers. If approved the City will receive up to $5 million to help low-income first-time buyers. Click here for more information on this valuable program.

 

Wednesday, Oct. 21

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved reports from the City Administrative Officer (CAO) and Bureau of Engineering to purchase 10 Homekey Properties to provide more than 500 units of supportive housing for those experiencing homelessness. In addition, within the report, up to $20 million of the $150 million reserved for the Homekey Program from the COVID-19 Federal Relief Fund was approved to be used to purchase a property at 6800 Avalon Blvd. Volunteers of America Los Angeles (VOALA) is seeking to convert three warehouses into a one-stop homeless facility completed over multiple phases. The multi-service center in Council District 9 would include more than 400 beds, 50 safe parking spaces, an on-site medical clinic, a navigation center, laundry facilities, storage for residents and a pet kennel. Click here to read more.

Additionally, the Ad-Hoc COVID-19 Recovery & Neighborhood Investment Committee  approved motions introduced by Council President Nury Martinez and seconded by Councilmember Price that provides $50 million in federal CARES Act funding to assist struggling low-income Angelenos with utility costs. The funding will be used to partner with the Department of Water and Power (LADWP) and will prioritize those already enrolled in the LADWP’s low-income assistance program. The plan aims to provide up to $500 to assist individuals with utility costs, including: gas service, cellular, phone, Wi-Fi and Internet/cable services. The goal of the program is to serve up to 100,000 households. Click here for more.

 

Tuesday, Oct. 20

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council discussed matters related to the upcoming election, affordable housing and solutions to help provide services to those who are homeless within the City of Los Angeles.

The City Council received updates from Los Angeles County Registrar Dean Logan on the services Los Angeles County is providing residents to safely and successfully cast their ballot on or before Nov. 3. Mr. Logan reported that more than 400,000 ballots have already been cast since ballots were sent to residents. In addition, a list of official ballot drop box locations were provided, as well as the locations of vote centers that will be open 10 days prior to Nov. 3. For more information on making a plan to vote and where to find an official ballot drop-box location and vote center near you visit lavote.net.  

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a motion by Councilmember Curren Price to provide $12 million in funding for the Hope on Broadway project on 5138 S. Broadway in  Council District 9. The project will provide 48-units of permanent supportive housing for homeless individuals and families. Click here to read more.

Finally, the City Council approved a series of reports and motions related to providing more adequate services to those experiencing homelessness in Los Angeles. The motions included exploring options to create partnerships to provide medical and mental health services to City residents in need of acute care at St. Vincent Medical Center, exploring ways to include Adult Residential Facilities and Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly into the City’s Homelessness Strategic Plan, and how health services are delivered to those experiencing homelessness. To read more follow the links here, here, here, here, and here.

 

Wednesday, Oct. 14

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved motions and resolutions to address issues of immigrant rights, mental health, and an unarmed model to crisis response.

The City Council approved a Planning and Land Use Management Committee report in relation to a motion that requests the City Attorney to prepare and present an ordinance that prohibits, and suspends, any certificate of occupancy for any hotel in the City detaining migrants under the direction of private security companies. The motion was introduced in response to a New York Times article that reported the Trump administration directed private security firms to use hotels to detain migrant children and families before expelling them from the United States. As a City of Sanctuary, the City of Los Angeles denounces all efforts to detain migrant children and their families within any facility within the City, including private hotels. Click here to read more.

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a report from the Ad Hoc Police Reform Committee relative to developing an unarmed model of crisis response. The report directs the various departments and offices, including the LAPD, to develop and issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) seeking one or more non-profit partners to implement a pilot program for mobile crisis response modeled after Oregon’s Crisis Assistance Helping Out on the Streets (CAHOOTS) program, which would enable 911 operators to dispatch contracted service providers and specialists for non-violent calls that may have a social service component in the City, which includes but is not limited to mental health, substance abuse and suicide threats. Additionally, the report asks for the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA), with assistance from the City Attorney, to report back in regard to changes to state and local laws that may be needed to expand the ability of unarmed civilians to handle certain duties currently handled by sworn officers that do not involve serious criminal activity. Read more here

 

Tuesday, Oct. 13

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved motions to provide funding and the purchase of land for two affordable housing projects, the La Prensa Libre Apartments and the Slauson Wall project, within Council District 9. To read more, click here and here.

Additionally, Councilmember Curren Price co-introduced a reward motion for any information regarding the whereabouts of Juan Carlos Hernandez. Hernandez is 21 years old and was reported missing by his mother on Sept. 22 after he did not return home following his shift at a cannabis dispensary. To date, the detectives investigating this missing person’s case have not been able to locate Hernandez and believe that a monetary reward may compel members of the public to provide information on Hernandez’s whereabouts. If an individual has any information, please contact LAPD’s missing person’s unit at (213) 996-1800. Tipsters can also call LAPD’s 24-hour anonymous tip line at 877-LAPD-24-7 or Crime Stoppers at (800) 222-8477. To read the full motion click here

 

Wednesday, Sept. 30 

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved a series of motions, resolutions and reports to provide funding for park improvements, guidance on parking enforcement and emphasizing the need for hiring locally. 

The City Council approved a report from the Planning and Land Use Management Committee pursuant to a motion that instructs the Department of City Planning to provide recommendations that would incorporate a local hire requirement into Development Agreements for projects in the City. The goal of this motion is to help provide job opportunities to neighbors in Los Angeles who work in service sector occupations. Read more here

Additionally, the City Council approved a report from the Health, Education, Neighborhoods, Parks, Arts, and River Committee that provides funding for the Southern Pacific Trails, Central Recreation Center and Trinity Recreation Center in Council District 9. Nearly $7 million will be allocated in order to make various improvements at these sites. Read more here

Further, the Los Angeles City Council approved a motion that directs the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) to resume parking enforcement and impounds when applicable for street cleaning, abandoned vehicles, oversize and overnight restrictions, peak hour and anti-gridlock zones, and expired registration beginning Oct. 15. Additionally, the motion instructs LADOT to begin enforcement of expired preferential parking district permits on Oct. 15, as well. The decision was made out of concern for health and safety. 

 

Tuesday, Sept. 29 

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved a series of motions and resolutions in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic, homelessness and upcoming ballot propositions. 

The Council adopted a resolution in support of Proposition 16, which would allow government agencies to give preferential consideration based on race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in employment, contracting and education. Proposition 16 is a ballot measure that would repeal Proposition 209, which has made it illegal to give preferential consideration to applicants based upon the above attributes. Many hope that if Proposition 16 is passed, government agencies, private businesses and universities will be able to consider candidates more holistically and become more diverse. Read more here

Additionally, the City Council adopted an ordinance that limits the amount of charges by third-party delivery services on retail food establishments when they are not operating at full capacity due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The third-party delivery services cannot charge more than 15 percent of the purchase price of each online order. During the pandemic, service charges have ballooned to exorbitant levels, which has made it difficult for businesses to meet their financial obligations as restrictions have been placed on how restaurants can serve customers. Read more here

Further, the City Council approved a motion that was seconded by Councilmember Curren Price that allocates $200,000 of Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) funding for the Downtown Women’s Center Health and Wellness program to provide meals to women in the Skid Row Area. Click here to read more. 

Finally, Councilmember Price introduced a motion requesting over $12 million in funding for the “La Prensa Libre Apartments” along Washington Boulevard. When completed, this project will provide 63 multifamily housing units within Council District 9. Click here for more. 

 

Wednesday, Sept. 23

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved a series of motions and reports to provide relief to Angelenos who have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The City Council approved two reports from the Ad Hoc Committee on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment. The first report is relative to addressing the practice of patient dumping by nursing homes in Los Angeles during the COVID-19 pandemic. The second establishes a COVID-19 Street Vending Recovery Fund, which would set aside $6 million to assist street vendors in obtaining permits and equipment to comply with City and County guidelines regarding street vending. The grants will be distributed through the Los Angeles Regional COVID Fund. The motion that initiated this report was seconded by Councilmember Price. To read more about each respectively, click here and here

The City Council also adopted recommendations from the Los Angeles Housing + Community Investment Department (HCIDLA) to create a COVID-19 Emergency Eviction Defense Program. The Defense Program will provide just over $7 million throughout a one year period, and options to extend the program if necessary, to provide legal services to renters who are facing or may potentially face eviction due to the inability to pay rent because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Defense program also amends contracts with eight FamilySource Centers (FSC) to expand services for families within Los Angeles. All Peoples Community Center, who works extensively with constituents in Council District 9, was awarded additional funding bringing their total to just under $500,000 to extend additional services. Click here and here for more.  

 

Tuesday, Sept. 22

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved a series of motions focusing on opportunities to provide more supportive and affordable housing, exploring how to better handle service calls that involve individuals dealing with mental health concerns, and receiving clarity on the Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count conducted by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA).  

The City Council adopted a Homelessness and Poverty Committee report that instructs LAHSA to report on the discrepancy between their count and the LA Times’ analysis in regards to the Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count conducted at the end of 2019. Within the same report, the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is asked to report on the current status of the Mental Evaluation Unit (MEU) and the Systemwide Mental Assessment Response Team (SMART) in regards to how these two resources are used when dealing with calls that involve mental health concerns. There is concern that the discrepancy in data between LAHSA’s report and the LA Times’ analysis may cause these two units to be underfunded leading to further issues as many individuals who are homeless deal with mental health problems. Read more here.

Further, the City Council approved reports from the Homelessness and Poverty Committee, as well as from the Housing Committee, exploring ways to incentivize construction of affordable housing units and matching people who are unhoused with new affordable housing units. The goal of exploring these options is to combat the rising prices in rent along with getting more individuals who live on the street housed. To read more about both click here and here.

Finally, Councilmember Curren Price had a motion approved by the City Council that allows for a site located at 6800 S. Avalon Blvd. to be evaluated and considered for development as a homeless shelter. If the location is found to be suitable, an additional 350 shelter beds and safe parking spaces will be provided for those who are unhoused. Councilmember Price also introduced a motion exploring ways to provide additional funding for two construction projects in his District that would provide housing for veterans experiencing homelessness. To read more about the proposals click here and here.

 

Wednesday, Sept. 16

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council received a report from the CAO detailing the status and occupancy of the Project Roomkey Program. The report indicated that as of Aug. 18, just under 4,000 rooms were operational in 37 hotels that were under contract with the City or the County. Over 95 percent of the hotel and motel rooms within City boundaries were occupied. To read the full report click here.

 

Tuesday, Sept. 15

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved motions to provide economic relief and meal assistance to Angelenos during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, the City Council introduced motions exploring best practices when responding to calls that involve individuals dealing with mental health and substance abuse issues. The Council also approved a motion to implement diversity and equity training for all Neighborhood Councils. To read more about this motion, click here

Councilmember Curren Price introduced a resolution that calls on the LA Times to diversify its staff to reflect the demographics of the City, including its Editorial Board, and meet all the demands listed in the respective letters by the Black and Latino Caucuses of the LA Times Guild that were addressed to Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong on June 23, 2020 and July 21, 2020. Like many other organizations, the Los Angeles Times has begun to conduct internal reviews of their staff makeup, as well as how their employees are compensated in order to ensure equity across all employees. This call follows numerous protests demanding racial justice across the country. 

The Los Angeles City Council approved two motions referred from the Ad Hoc Committee on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment that provide pathways in assisting seniors and individuals with disabilities citywide to continue to receive meals during the coronavirus pandemic. The motions provide recommendations for the City Administrative Officer (CAO) and the City of Los Angeles Department of Aging to expand existing programs and partnerships with local organizations that have helped in delivering meals throughout the Safer-at-Home Order. Read more here and here.

In an effort to provide more economic relief to Angelenos, the City Council approved a motion by Council President Nury Martinez that was seconded by Councilman Price that directs the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) to report with a proposal for a debt relief and forgiveness program for low-income ratepayers who have fallen behind on their bills due to circumstances caused by the COVID-19 crisis. The motion also provides instruction to include bill stabilization efforts for low-income taxpayers to prevent new debt from being accumulated. Read more here.

Additionally, the City Council approved a motion that instructs the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD), with assistance from the City Attorney and the City’s domestic violence partners, to report on ways to provide resources for domestic violence victims who work at essential businesses. The Safer-at-Home Order, which was implemented to slow the spread of COVID-19, has unintentionally exacerbated the already fragile dynamic for victims of domestic violence as many have to shelter with their abusers. By providing resources for victims at work, the hope is that domestic violence victims will be given an outlet to report abuse without fear of retaliation. Read more here.

Finally, multiple councilmembers, including Councilmember Price, introduced a motion instructing the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA) with assistance from the Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD) and LAPD to report on the pending agreement between the LAFD and the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (DMH) for the Therapeutic Van Pilot Program, as well as a Mental Health Services Pilot Program. These programs might be a component of the unarmed crisis response that would divert non-violent service calls away from the LAPD and to appropriate non-law enforcement agencies, which is something the City Council has discussed previously. Read the motion here

 

Tuesday, Sept. 8

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved a series of motions and resolutions related to sidewalk vending, park improvements, as well as continued promotion of small businesses within the City of Los Angeles. Details below:

The LA City Council approved a proposal by Councilmember Curren Price that extends the reduced fee of $291 for a City Sidewalk and Park Vending Permit through July 1, 2021. Originally, the reduced fee was scheduled to end on June 30, 2020 and increase to $541. This change was made in response to the devastating economic hardships many vendors have faced due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The fee deferral will allow legal vendors time to recover from the economic loss they have suffered through during the stay-at-home order and give them an opportunity to get back on their feet before having to pay the full permit fee next year. “We worked so hard to bring our sidewalk vendors out of the shadows only to have COVID-19 pose a new threat to their livelihoods,” added Councilmember Price. “The street vendor community includes some of the most economically vulnerable groups in Los Angeles- undocumented workers, women and the elderly. An extension of time to pay a reduced permit fee brings some relief as they navigate through these challenging times with limited help.” Click here to read the full ordinance.

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council adopted a report from the Economic Development Committee to encourage and incentivize women-owned and minority-owned businesses to bid on City Contracts. The report requests the City Attorney, with help from the Department of General Services, to report on steps the City can take to ensure that qualified women-owned and minority-owned businesses are awarded contracts with the City. The original motion, which the report is based off, was introduced as there is a perception that large entities are regularly awarded City contracts, and with it these smaller businesses become discouraged from applying. Read the motion here.

Finally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a motion by Councilmember Price that will transfer over $450,000 for park improvements at Vermont Square Park and South Park. The funding will be used to install new lighting, security cameras, and other enhancements at each park. Read the motion here.

 

Wednesday, Sept. 2

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved a series of motions and resolutions related to affordable housing, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the road to recovery for the City of Los Angeles

The Los Angeles City Council approved a Homelessness and Poverty Committee Report and a resolution relative to funding for the Marcella Gardens Project on Main Street within Council District 9. The Marcella Gardens project is new construction that will provide 59 units of supportive housing for Transition-Age Youth, homeless individuals, and veterans. Click here to read more.

The Los Angeles City Council also approved a report from the Health, Education, Neighborhoods, Parks, Arts, and River Committee relative to the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) grant funds for the City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks (RAP). RAP has received JJCPA grant funding over the last 19 years to continue programs designed to serve at-risk youth through RAP’s Clean and Safe Spaces (CLASS) Parks Youth Employment Internship Program. Click here for more. 

Councilmember Price also introduced a motion that reprograms $450,000 from the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) from the 2019-2020 program year for improvements to Vermont Square Park and South Park. Click here for more.

Finally, the Los Angeles City Council adopted a resolution declaring a fiscal emergency within Los Angeles due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In an effort to make up for the budget shortfalls, the City will furlough thousands of City employees beginning on Oct. 11, 2020 through June 20, 2021. The projected savings in doing this will be over $100 million dollars. Click here and here for more. 

 

Tuesday, Sept. 1

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and adopted various motions and resolutions related to the COVID-19 pandemic, legal services, as well as street improvements within Council District 9.

With motions and resolutions related to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Los Angeles City Council approved a report from the Personnel and Animal Welfare Committee to instill a temporary waiver of redemption fees for low-income City of Los Angeles residents who have been negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. By doing this, residents will not have to worry about paying this fee if they recover their pet from an animal shelter. Click here for more.

Additionally, the City Council approved a $1 million allocation in the FY 2020-2021 Adopted Budget for the Los Angeles Justice Fund (LAJF). The LAJF helps provide legal assistance for immigrants within Los Angeles. The allocation covers from July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021. Click here for more. 

Further, the City Council authorized the General Manager of the Los Angeles Housing + Community Investment Department (HCIDLA) to accept over $9 million in 2020-2022 Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) Cares Act funding for various services, which include the City’s 16 FamilySource Centers (FSC), as well as the City’s 10 Domestic Violence/Human Trafficking Shelters. The FSCs help provide services like social, educational, and family and wellness services to low-income residents within the City of Los Angeles. The Domestic Violence shelters help provide services to those individuals who have been victims of domestic violence. Click here for more.

The Los Angeles City Council also approved a motion that was seconded by Councilmember Curren Price that allocates $50 million of the COVID-19 Federal Relief Fund for a paycheck assistance program and right-to-recover program. The right-to-recover program would help supplement low-wage workers who test positive for COVID-19 and need financial assistance as many workers are unable to telecommute and have no paid sick leave or health insurance. This includes housekeepers, gardeners, laborers, bus drivers, and gig workers, for example. Additionally, the motion explores the feasibility of extending these benefits to low-income households, particularly those left out of federal assistance. Click here for more.

Adding on, the Los Angeles City Council approved an additional $30 million allocation from the COVID-19 Federal Relief funds for the Small Business Emergency Loan Program. This motion was co-presented by Councilmember Price. Click here for more. Link to application click here

The Los Angeles City Council considered a motion that instructs HCIDLA to develop a COVID-19 Eviction Defense Program and report back on their findings during the week of Sept. 7. The motion gives instructions to allocate up to $8 million from the Community Development Block Grant to HCIDLA for a one-year emergency program. At the conclusion of the year, HCID will report on the outcome of the program and return any unspent funds. Click here for more.

The Los Angeles City Council approved a motion instructing the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety along with the City Attorney to present an ordinance that suspends all citation enforcement for temporary signs for businesses until the end of the COVID-19 State of Emergency. Many businesses have used these temporary signs during the COVID-19 pandemic to communicate with customers their hours of business, as well as clarifying if they are open for take-out or dine-in when looking at restaurants. Click here for more.

Lastly, Councilmember Price introduced a motion relative to installing speed humps on Budlong Avenue between 47th and 48th Streets, as well as on 47th Street between Budlong and Raymond Avenues. The goal of the speed humps is to slow cars from speeding and provide a safer environment for pedestrians within Council District 9.  Click here for more.

 

Wednesday, Aug. 26

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved a series of motions, reports and resolutions to promote more affordable and supportive housing and funding related to relief programs in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The City Council approved two motions that instructs various City departments to look into the feasibility of utilizing unused Airbnb units for affordable housing, as well as having the Department of General Services, with the assistance of the Department of City Planning, to create a list of publicly owned properties that are suitable for the development of supportive housing. These actions are another step in trying to mitigate the homelessness crisis within the City. Click here and here

The City Council also approved a report from the Housing committee exploring the feasibility of allowing the installation or use of air condition units by tenants in apartments without air conditioning, and classifying air condition as a service requiring urgent repair and incentives for property owners. This report was approved in light of the recent heat wave that Southern California has been experiencing over the last few weeks, which has been one of the worst in California’s history. Read more here.

Further, the City Council amended an ordinance that placed a cap on Third-Party Food Delivery Service Fees, which makes it unlawful for a third-party food delivery service to charge a restaurant a fee per online order more than 15 percent of the purchase price of the order. The amendment extends the current sunset date on the ordinance of August 31, 2020 to 90 days after restaurants are able to resume indoor dining capacity at 100 percent and the ordinance would be in effect at any point if the restaurants are required to reduce their indoor capacity due to the COVID-19 virus. Read more here.

Additionally, the City Council passed a series of resolutions supporting a 1 percent income tax on individuals who make more than $1 million annually to fund affordable housing (link); supporting legislation that would implement ethnic studies or social justice class requirements in the State UC and any other college system California has control over (link); support for a House resolution that would allocate $120 billion in relief to the food and drink service industry through the end of 2020 (link); and a resolution in support of a state bill that would establish a direct allocation to provide upgrades to broadband infrastructure in low-income census blocks to enable distance learning and telehealth and telemedicine (link)

The Los Angeles City Council approved a series of reports from the Ad Hoc Committee on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment to authorize the use of over $50 million of the CARES Act Federal funding to help with various programs, including the LA Regional COVID-19 Relief and Recovery Fund, the COVID-19 Childcare Relief and Recovery Fund (link), funding for Alternative Learning Centers and the Childcare Voucher Program (link), and services for victims of domestic violence, including undocumented immigrants, during the Safer at Home Order (link). As the COVID-19 pandemic has continued, this funding is essential in supporting Angelenos stay afloat until individuals can return to work and school when the COVID-19 virus is mitigated. 

Along the lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, the City Council approved an additional report from the Ad Hoc Committee on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment relative to a motion that requests the City Attorney to prepare and present an ordinance, which would require all employers to report to the City and the County when three or more of its employees test positive for COVID-19 in a two-week period. As Los Angeles begins to re-open, it is critical that new cases are reported to avoid another large outbreak similar to what the City has seen in the past few months. Read the motion here.

Finally, the City Council considered motions in exploring options to continue the ability for both City employees and businesses within Los Angeles to continue to telework following the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a belief that if Angelenos have the ability to continue to telework following the pandemic, the City’s air quality will benefit in ways similar to the beginning of the Safer at Home Order when travel was severely limited. Click here and here

 

Tuesday, Aug. 25

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved various motions to update the structure of Neighborhood Councils, promote the creation of jobs, improve transportation infrastructure within the City, exploration of a new City legal holiday and help establish Los Angeles as a Fair Trade City.

The City Council adopted a resolution that establishes a uniform minimum voting age, minimum board member service age, and optional youth board seat for Neighborhood Councils. The ordinance also revises a definition of a Community Interest Stakeholder for Neighborhood Councils. The City Council requested these changes presented in the ordinance in an effort to make Neighborhood Councils more uniform throughout the City. Read more here.

Additionally, the City Council approved requests from the Personnel and Animal Welfare Committee that asks the Personnel Department to draft a report of City and County jobs that have a legal status requirement and to draft an additional report on the feasibility of creating a program that would provide a pathway to citizenship through City Jobs. In many instances an individual’s citizenship status can be limiting in their ability to find gainful employment. These reports are an attempt to make it easier for Angelenos who are undocumented as they are integral in making Los Angeles the city that it is. Click here and here

Further, the Los Angeles City Council advanced two motions authored by Councilmember Curren Price:

The City Council approved a report by the Personnel and Animal Welfare Committee in relation to a motion by Councilmember Price that would establish Juneteenth as a City legal holiday. The Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA), with assistance from the Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) and the Civil and Human Rights Commission, are to report on the historical importance and cultural impact of Juneteenth, and options for establishing Juneteenth as a legal holiday in the City of Los Angeles. Read more here

The Council also approved a motion authorizing the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) to apply for up to $16 million from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to expand the City’s efforts to install BlueLA electric vehicle car share stations and charging facilities, subsidize micromobilty and electric bicycle access, implement an electric vehicle neighborhood shuttle, and develop a Mobility Wallet to distribute sustainable transportation subsidies, throughout South Los Angeles. The goal of the project is to address community residents’ transportation needs, increase access to key destinations, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by funding clean transportation. Read the full motion here

Continuing, the Los Angeles City Council approved a motion that directs the Personnel Department and the CAO to explore the opportunity of adding new or additional Targeted Local Hire (TLH) eligible positions within various City departments. The Fiscal Year 2020-2021 Adopted Budget set aside $90 million for various services, including the TLH program. The TLH program was exempt from the hiring freeze due to the COVID-19 pandemic and because of this there may be an opportunity to add more positions, which will help reinvest into underserved communities. Read more here

The City Council approved a resolution to establish Los Angeles a Fair Trade City and help establish World Fair Trade Day in the City of Los Angeles. With the adoption of this resolution, Los Angeles is dedicated to supporting decent and ethical labor standards through means that sustain the Earth, as well as economic fairness and rights for women and children. Read the full resolution here

Councilmember Price introduced a motion to initiate the process of changing the name of Figueroa Street from Olympic Boulevard to Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard to “Kobe Bryant Boulevard.” The renaming of Figueroa is in honor of the late Kobe Bryant who died tragically on January 26, 2020 in a helicopter crash with his daughter, Gianna, and seven others. The City of Los Angeles and the world lost a sports legend who was only beginning his second act, an act devoted to lifting up and inspiring others. Although he is gone physically, his legacy will forever be commemorated in the heart of Los Angeles. Read the full motion here

Lastly, during the the Economic Development Committee meeting, chaired by Councilmember Price, they approved a report and ordinance from the City Attorney to extend the reduced cost of a vending operating permit until July 1, 2021. Originally, the deadline for vendors to get a reduced cost vending operating permit was July 1, 2020. However, with the COVID-19 pandemic, and corresponding State and local “stay-at-home” orders have had severe public health, social, and economic impact on the City’s street vendors. Additionally, this community has largely been ineligible to receive any form of federal financial assistance. The ordinance will now go before the full City Council in the upcoming weeks. Read the report here.

 

Wednesday, Aug. 19

On Wednesday, the LA City Council introduced and approved a series of motions and resolutions related to youth justice, transportation, police oversight and coronavirus relief efforts. 

The City Council approved a report from the Budget and Finance Committee and communication from the Chair of the Immigrant Affairs, Civil Rights, and Equity Committee to request the Mayor include a $1 million allocation for the Fiscal Year 2020-2021 Budget for a one-year extension to the Los Angeles Justice Fund (LAJF), from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021, allowing grantees to continue to provide legal representation services to new and existing cases. The LAJF has existed since 2017, and is an innovative public-private partnership between the County of Los Angeles, City of Los Angeles, California Community Foundation (CCF), and Weingart Foundation. The partnership has provided a critical safety net for local immigrant residents and their families through LAJF. The report will now be sent back to the Budget and Finance and Immigrant Affairs, Civil Rights, and Equity committees to request the Mayor include a $1 million allocation for the committees for further discussion. To read the full report and motion click here

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a motion by Councilmember Curren Price that instructs the Chief Legislative Analyst to request the California Attorney General to conduct an independent review of an officer-involved shooting in South LA on April 22 that resulted in the death of Daniel Hernandez. Consistent with the demands being heard across the nation for greater accountability, transparency, and fairness within police departments, Councilman Price introduced this motion to ensure that the investigation is done in a fair and impartial manner. Read the full motion here

Further, Councilmember Curren Price introduced a motion asking the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) to apply for up to $16 million from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to expand the City’s efforts to install BlueLA electric vehicle car share stations and charging facilities, subsidize micromobilty and electric bicycle access, implement an electric vehicle neighborhood shuttle, and develop a Mobility Wallet to distribute sustainable transportation subsidies, throughout South Los Angeles. The goal of the project is to address community residents’ transportation needs, increase access to key destinations, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by funding clean transportation. Read the full motion here

Finally, Councilmember Price alongside Council President Nury Martinez approved releasing approximately $175 million in Federal CARES Act funds to assist Angelenos during the Ad-Hoc COVID-19 Recovery & Neighborhood Investment Committee on Wednesday. The recommendations from the committee will go before the full City Council for approval in the near future. They include:  

  • $100 million ($200 million total approved to date) to address homelessness. Read more here.
  • $40 million to award non-repayable grants to assist small businesses, and non-profits, including $4 million to assist low-income workers, such as street vendors. Click on the following links to read more 1, 2
  • $30 million in childcare support, including childcare stipends dedicated to low-income families, and establishing Alternative Learning Sites at Recreation and Park facilities so children have a place to go and learn while their parents are at work, and assistance to keep childcare providers operational. Read more here
  • $5 million for domestic violence and human trafficking victims assistance through Project Safe Haven. Read more here.

 

Wednesday, Aug. 12

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved a series of motions, resolutions, and reports regarding efforts to mitigate homelessness and provide relief for working families affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The City Council approved reports from the Health, Education, Neighborhoods, Parks, Arts, and River Committee, as well as the Planning and Land Use Management Committee regarding a motion on the Early Childhood Education (ECE) programs and approval for childcare facilities within the City of Los Angeles. ECE programs are critical for promoting cognitive, social and emotional development of children between the ages of 0-5. During the COVID-19 pandemic, numerous child care centers and in-home daycares have shut down, which exacerbates the child care shortage in California. Approval of these reports in response to the motion introduced will attempt to make it easier for more of these facilities to open in an effort to provide relief to working families and promote the social well-being of young children. The motion provides a series of recommendations to various departments outlining best practices for ECEs. Read them here.

Further, Councilmember Price introduced a motion instructing the CAO, CLA, the Bureau of Engineering, the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA), and any other affected City stakeholders, to evaluate the possibility of adding a combined additional 350 shelter beds and safe parking spots at the site located at 6800 S. Avalon Blvd., which is currently in development through two separate projects approved under the Proposition HHH Permanent Supportive Housing Loan Program 2018-2019 Project Expenditure Plan. This motion is in response to the 2020 Point-In-Time count of homeless individuals report by LASHA released in June. The goal of the additional beds and safe parking spaces is to continue to provide shelter to those experiencing homelessness and help with the homelessness crisis Los Angeles is facing. Read the full motion here.

 

Tuesday, Aug. 11

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council introduced and approved a series of motions, resolutions, and reports regarding efforts to mitigate homelessness, promote a productive legislative body and continue to push for a more equal society.

The City Council approved reports from the Rules, Elections, and Intergovernmental Relations Committee regarding the development of an Office of Anti-Corruption and Transparency (LA ACT), as well as a report regarding the 2020 Redistricting Process. The creation of the LA ACT is in response to an effort to reign in quid pro quo activity amongst Los Angeles elected officials over the last several years that has resulted in officials stepping down and in some cases being charged with various crimes. To read more about the LA ACT, click here

The report related to the 2020 Redistricting Process authorizes the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA), the Chief Administrative Officer (CAO), the City Council Redistricting Commission, and the LAUSD Redistricting Commission, to coordinate the best process to redraw district boundaries for both the City Council and LAUSD School Board. This process is required following the decennial U.S. Census, which began this year on April 1. This process must be completed before the next City election in March 2022. The Council also introduced an amendment to help ensure the redistricting process remains fair and ethical as all commissioners must participate in a series of trainings before they begin. To read more about the process and the amendments, click the following links: 1 and 2

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a motion that authorizes the CAO with the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA) to apply on behalf of the City to the State’s Homekey Program for the maximum award of $250 million. The goal of this program is to build upon Project Roomkey by facilitating the acquisition of properties for interim and permanent housing for individuals experiencing homelessness or at-risk of experiencing homelessness and who are impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The funding will be prioritized for properties that can be occupied within 90 days and interim housing that leads to permanent housing or placements. Additionally, the Council requested that a status update be provided to the Ad Hoc Committee on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment on the grant process every two weeks and a monthly report on site acquisitions, occupancy and operations. For more information, click on the following links: 1, 2, 3  

Further, Councilmember Curren Price co-presented a resolution in support of H.R. 35 (Rush), the Emmett Till Antilynching Act, that would make lynching a Federal Crime. Emmett Till was a 14-year-old African American boy who was brutally murdered after a white woman alleged that he flirted and harassed her. The woman later recanted her testimony. Over 200 pieces of Federal legislation have been introduced to make lynching a Federal crime, but none have passed. Read more about the resolution here.

Councilmember Price introduced a motion instructing the Bureau of Street Services, Bureau of Sanitation, the Department of Building and Safety, and any other departments as needed, to report to the Council on recommendations to mitigate public safety and right-of-way accessibility issues originating from the illegal storage of wooden pallets, including recommendations for any necessary code changes, public signage, and any other enhanced enforcement capabilities. This motion is in response to a fire that erupted in the Central Alameda neighborhood in May 2020 at a yard used for storing wooden pallets. The fire forced the evacuation of residents who lived nearby. Over 100 firefighters were deployed to control the blaze, which destroyed surrounding power lines, causing the explosion of several transformers. Read more about the motion here.

Finally, the Public Safety Committee approved a motion introduced by Councilman Price calling for an independent investigation into the officer-involved shooting of Daniel Hernandez on April 22, 2020. The LAPD is conducting their own investigation; however, an independent investigation is a needed step as the officer, who was involved, is the daughter of a senior Los Angeles Police Protective League board member. The matter will now return to the full City Council for a decision in the coming weeks. Read the motion here.

 

Wednesday, Aug. 5 

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council approved and introduced a series of motions and resolutions related to homelessness, prison labor, the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the Target Local Hire program. 

Councilman Price along with Councilmembers Marqueece Harris-Dawson and Paul Krekorian introduced a motion that would transfer $20 million from the set aside $90 million in the Unappropriated Balance in the 2020-21 Fiscal Year Budget for a new line item entitled: “Targeted Local Hire Program-Disadvantaged Communities” in order to better focus on the needs of disadvantaged communities. Many individuals included in these communities suffer from the same injustices that were highlighted by the protests following the killing of George Floyd in May. This includes formerly incarcerated individuals, disconnected youth, current and formerly homeless individuals, transgender individuals, and individuals with disabilities. 

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a report from the Homelessness and Poverty Committee that instructs the CLA with help from other agencies to make recommendations to the City Council on the most effective way to establish a Commission on Lived Experiences with Homelessness, which would be composed entirely of people who are currently, or have been in the recent past, homeless in Los Angeles. The Commission will be required to reflect the demographic of the City’s homeless population accounting for the dramatic over-representation of African-Americans in our homelessness population, and including proper representation for seniors, veterans, women, immigrants, youth, and transgender communities, among others. The establishment of this Commission will be significant as it will help inform the City on how to best serve the City’s homeless population when looking at how to get them the necessary resources in order to get them housed. Councilmember Price was supportive of this action. 

Further, the Los Angeles City Council approved a motion that instructs the CLA with help from the CAO and the City Attorney to report on the process to prohibit the City from procuring goods and services derived from prison labor; and, to report on how to implement a disclosure requirement for all products, supplies, food, equipment, goods, and services that are made with prison labor. This is significant as those who are incarcerated are not normally given proper protections while on the job and they are compensated well under the federal and state minimum wage. Councilmember Price was supportive of the motion. 

The Los Angeles City Council also approved a motion to support AB 1436 (David Chiu), which would prevent landlords from applying security deposits or monthly rental payments to any obligation incurred during the COVID-19 state of emergency and defers those rental obligations to 15 months following termination of the state of emergency. The bill is significant as it would help ease the financial burden many individuals have faced due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Councilmember Price supported the resolution. 

Finally, Mayor Eric Garcetti announced that the Department of Water and Power is authorized to shut off water and power at residences that are hosts to large parties and gatherings in defiance of the Safer at Home order. This is in response to numerous reports regarding LAPD getting noise complaints in regards to a series of large house parties that have been taking place throughout the City. This announcement is an effort to discourage these large gatherings in an attempt to reduce the spread of COVID-19. 

 

Tuesday, Aug. 4  

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council passed a motion introduced by Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez, and seconded by Councilmember Curren Price, that requests the Youth Development Task Force, with assistance from the Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA) and Chief Administrative Officer (CAO), to report to Council on the development of the City of Los Angeles Youth Development Strategy to effectively serve the needs of youth within the City. In addition, the motion asks for a report on the steps necessary to establish a department, commission, or office, including funding options for implementing the youth development strategy.

The motion is significant as nearly 200,000 youth within the City live in poverty, nearly 70,000 are disconnected – meaning they are between the ages of 16 through 24 and are neither in school nor working, and more than 3,000 are homeless. However, no single entity provides fiduciary or inter-agency oversight or coordination, assesses the service landscape at a macro level to identify service gaps, or establishes metrics for data-driven outcomes and evaluations. 

 

Wednesday, July 29

Juneteenth

On Wednesday, Councilman Curren Price introduced a motion exploring the possibility of making Juneteenth a legal City holiday. Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States dating back to June 19, 1865.

In light of recent protests that demand for racial equity and justice within the country in response to the unarmed killings of Black Americans at the hands of police like those of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and countless other Black Americans, there has been a heightened call to commemorate, celebrate and acknowledge the historical significance of Juneteenth.

While Juneteenth is widely known within the Black community in the American South, nationally it is not recognized. The motion instructs the Chief Legislative Analyst, with assistance of the City Administrative Officer and the Civil and Human Rights Commission, to report on the historical importance and cultural impact of Juneteenth, and provide options for establishing Juneteenth as a legal holiday in LA.

CARE+ Cleanups

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a motion authorizing the Bureau of Sanitation to resume CARE+ (Comprehensive Cleaning and Rapid Engagement Plus) cleanups of homeless encampments around A Bridge Home temporary shelters only. The intensive cleanups will resume following their suspension on March 17 during the beginning of the COVID-19 City declared emergency. The motion also instructs the Bureau of Sanitation to report back in two weeks on a verification process that includes Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, report on the level of service being provided by CARE+ cleanups, accommodations provided to unhoused persons identified as self-isolating due to possible exposure of COVID-19, and a sign-off/certification from the Environmental Compliance Inspector and the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority that all of these guidelines are verified.

The major cleanups are important in ensuring the area around the bridge housing sites are clean, which is extremely important during the COVID-19 pandemic. Councilmember Price supported the motion.

911 Calls Resolution

Further, Councilmember Price co-presented a resolution in support of AB-1550 (Assemblymember Rob Bonta), which would create a private right of action against a person who makes a 911 call aimed at violating the rights of other persons based upon race, religion, sex, or any other protected class statewide in California.

This resolution is significant as Councilmember Price introduced a motion back in June that would make 911 calls motivated by racial bias illegal within the City of Los Angeles.

Cannabis Regulation

The Los Angeles City Council approved an ordinance, which updates Section 104.19 of Article 4, Chapter X of the Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC) giving new guidelines regarding fees and fines associated with Commercial Cannabis regulations. The ordinance provides various guidelines including for Social Equity program applicants, non-retailer commercial cannabis activity in a business premise, and storefront retailer cannabis activity. To read the full ordinance follow this link: https://clkrep.lacity.org/onlinedocs/2020/20-0782_ORD_186703_07-10-2020.pdf

 

Wednesday, July 1

On Wednesday, the LA City Council approved Councilman Price’s proposed plan to reduce $150 million from the LAPD 2020-2021 budget and reinvest $100 million of those dollars into communities of color for youth work programs, local hire efforts, and other social programming. Councilmember Price’s motion modifies Mayor Eric Garcetti’s $10.5 billion original proposed budget and reallocates $90 million into communities of color, re-envisioning public safety, as well as the City’s targeted local hire program. In addition, it sets aside $10 million for the Economic and Workforce Development Department (EWDD) Summer Youth Employment and Workforce Development benefitting disadvantaged communities. 

Additionally, the Los Angeles City Council approved a series of motions to help support families during the COVID-19 pandemic. One motion instructs the Department of Recreation and Parks to report back on using some of their facilities as child care centers as the economy reopens. Additionally, a motion seconded by Councilmember Price and authored by Council President Martinez, provides over $500,000 in COVID-19 Federal relief funding to the Department of Recreation and Parks for Summer Play LA. This funding will help provide summer programming for 2,000 children as the economy begins to open and parents return back to work. 

Further, the LA City Council approved a motion by Council President Martinez and seconded by Councilmember Price to grant $100 million from COVID-19 Federal relief funding be used to help establish the COVID-19 Homelessness Roadmap, which will help create 6,000 new beds in each council district. Additionally, $25 million of the $100 million will be used to help order shelter, hygiene trailers and other supplies. 

The City Council instructed the Department of Transportation to continue, through the month of July, to suspend the enforcement of residential street sweeping, peak/rush hour and anti-gridlock zone restrictions, abandoned vehicles (72-hour rule) and expired registrations. The motion further instructs the Department to waive all parking citations issued in the month of July with respect to the categories above that may be issued in the month of July.

Councilmember Price introduced a motion instructing the LAPD to request the California Attorney General’s Office to conduct an independent review of the fatal shooting of Daniel Hernandez by an LAPD Officer in the Newton Division on April 22, 2020. LAPD encountered Hernandez when reporting to a traffic collision back in April. Reports state that he had a knife when officers arrived on scene. The shooting happened when Hernandez approached law enforcement with a knife after he was asked to place it on the ground.

Councilmember Price introduced a motion that instructs the Personnel Department to halt consideration of a Police Officer candidate’s cannabis use when conducting and evaluating a background investigation, and that the Personnel Department report to Council in 30 days on the status of this matter. This is in response to the LAPD application website stating that the use of illegal drugs and abuse of alcohol or prescription medications are potentially disqualifying factors for a candidate; however, it makes no mention of cannabis use. Considering that adult cannabis use has been legal for several years, and the City’s regulatory authority over cannabis, there is an inconsistency to consider cannabis use as a negative factor when assessing a Police Officer candidate.

 

Tuesday, June 30

On Tuesday, the City Council unanimously approved Councilman Price’s motion that would make it illegal to call 911 to make a false or frivolous report based on racial bias. While it is illegal to make a false 911 report, the current law does not address 911 calls used in a racially motivated way. The motion asks for the City Attorney and the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) to report back on options that could include criminal penalties, as well as giving the victims the right to seek damages and bring about private civil actions against the perpetrator. 

Also on Tuesday, the City Council backed a motion that Councilman Price co-presented alongside LA City Council President Nury Martinez, and Councilmembers Herb Wesson and Marqueece Harris-Dawson, that would require unarmed, non-law enforcement agencies to respond to non-violent situations as an alternative to dispatching a police officer. The motion calls for the development of a crisis response system made up of service providers, including medical professionals, mental health workers, homelessness experts and other professional social workers, with specialized training to replace police in non-violent, non-emergency crises. 

Councilmembers Price, Wesson, Harris-Dawson and Mike Bonin introduced a motion that would remove the LAPD from enforcing traffic laws and moving violations. The legislation would direct the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) and other city staff to consult with community stakeholders and suggest alternative methods of enforcing traffic laws, such as speeding, illegal turns, and other vehicle code violations, that do not require armed officers. The report will look at national and international best practices, and consider transferring enforcement authority from the LAPD to LADOT, as well as using automated equipment.

The Los Angeles City Council instructed the Economic & Workforce Development Department (EWDD) and the Personnel Department to work with the LA County Department of Public Health to solicit input from community groups and nonprofits to help with a hiring plan for Community Care Corps, to fill gaps in our healthcare system, as well as provide meaningful employment to residents who need it as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Additionally, the City Council approved a motion by Councilmember Price to request the Office of the Inspector General, with assistance from the LAPD and the Department of Civil and Human Rights to report with a thorough review on the tactics used by the LAPD on Saturday, May 30, 2020 in the vicinity of the Fairfax District during peaceful protests and the chain of events that led to the decision to have LAPD officers engage with protesters. 

In a similar motion, the City Council also called for an investigation on the use of rubber bullets and other types of riot control ammunition into crowds of peaceful protests, as well as how LAPD dealt with individuals arrested for failing to disperse when ordered to do so after a curfew was put into place throughout the county. Finally, the motion instructs Gerald Chaleff, the author of the LAPD’s review of the 2007 May Day incident in MacArthur Park, to take the lead of the review of LAPD actions during recent protests.

 

Wednesday, June 24 

911 Motion Advances 

On Wednesday, Councilman Price’s motion that would make it illegal to use the 911 emergency system to file a report, or cause a report to be made to law enforcement agencies, that an “emergency or threat” exists when the call is based on racial bias, and the caller knows that the report is false or frivolous was approved in the Ad Hoc Committee on Police Reform. The proposal will go back to Council for a final vote. 

Council Declares Racism a Public Health Crisis 

The Los Angeles City Council adopted a resolution declaring racism as a public health crisis that affects all of Los Angeles. The resolution also calls for an assessment of internal City policies and procedures, beginning with the budget process, to ensure racial justice is a core element of city government. In addition, the resolution takes steps to support community efforts to combat systemic racism against Black and Brown communities within Los Angeles by examining how policies affect delivery of human and social services, economic development, and public safety. The resolution was drafted by Councilmembers Price, Herb Wesson and Marqueece Harris-Dawson. 

 

Tuesday, June 23

$100 Million Rental Assistance Program

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council established the COVID-19 Emergency Rental Assistance Subsidy (ERAS) Program by allocating $100 million from the CARES Act Federal Relief Funds. This program is the first in the nation; its goal is to assist those who are unable to meet their rent due to the COVID-19 pandemic and to protect them from becoming unhoused. 

Under the program, eligible individuals can receive up to $2,000 a month for qualified renters and renting households. Additionally, Los Angeles’ 16 Family Source Centers (FSC) will have $1 million to help families who have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, there are protections that do not allow a landlord to evict tenants for six months following the lifting of the emergency declaration if they accept funds from the relief program. 

Los Angeles Regional Relief and Recovery Fund 

The Los Angeles City Council approved a motion by Councilmember Curren Price to have the City participate in the Los Angeles Regional Relief and Recovery Fund in collaboration with LA County. The purpose of the fund is to provide loan and grant capital to Los Angeles small businesses, micro-entrepreneurs and nonprofit organizations. The program also has goals to ensure equitable access to capital across geography, demographics and borrower type and undertake a coordinated and strategic fundraising approach to maximize resources for the regional recovery fund.

This fund was championed by Councilmember Price as a critical lifeline for the City’s economy. The coronavirus has caused significant disruption to the Food and Beverage, and leisure and hospitality industries, especially within the region’s small businesses, which provide the majority of employment for residents within Los Angeles. 

City Council Votes to Suspend Councilman Jose Huizar

The City Council voted to suspend Councilmember Jose Huizar, who represents the 14th Council District, after he was arrested and charged with racketeering earlier this week. 

 

Wednesday, June 17

On Wednesday, Councilmember Price introduced two motions related to further reform related to the LAPD. In one motion, Councilmember Price requested for the LAPD, with assistance from the Personnel Department, to report on its efforts to diversify its sworn workforce, especially with respect to African Americans officers. In addition, the motion requests the LAPD to report on ways to ensure that its recruitment initiatives target local residents, and the feasibility of implementing preferential hiring status for graduates of the Los Angeles Unified School District. Read the full motion here

Councilman Price also introduced a motion that would make it illegal to use the 911 emergency system to file a report, or cause a report to be made to law enforcement agencies, that an “emergency or threat” exists when the call is based on racial bias, and the caller knows that the report is false or frivolous. While it is illegal to make a false 911 report, the current law does not address 911 calls used in a racially motivated way. The motion asks for the City Attorney and the LAPD to report back on options to prevent the reporting of false accusations based on racially-biased complaints. Options include criminal penalties, as well as giving the victims the right to bring private civil actions against the perpetrator. Read the full motion here

The Los Angeles City Council approved a motion to explore options on placing an “Empty Homes Penalty” on housing units that remain vacant. The need for this motion comes from the severe homelessness crisis the City is facing coupled with lack of affordable housing within Los Angeles. The motion instructs the Chief Legislative Analyst, with assistance with from the City Administrative Officer to explore vacancy taxes, “Empty Homes” penalties, and speculator taxes used in other jurisdictions and report to Council policy options for a potential “Empty Homes Penalty” structure in Los Angeles, for Consideration by voters in 2020. Read the full motion here

 

Tuesday, June 16

On Tuesday, The City Council approved a motion, which was co-presented by Councilmember Price, that directed the City Administrative Officer and Chief Legislative Analyst, with help from the Mayor, to identify ways to cut $100 to $150 million from the LAPD’s budget for the new fiscal year starting on July 1. The money would be reallocated to underrepresented communities and communities of color within the City of Los Angeles. Read the full motion here

Additionally, Councilman Price co-presented a motion with six other Councilmembers that requests for the development of an unarmed model of crisis response that would divert non-violent calls for service, which includes calls related to mental health, substance abuse, and neighbor disputes, away from the LAPD to the appropriate non-law enforcement agencies. This proposed model is based off of the CAHOOTS program in Eugene, Oregon. Read the full motion here

Further, Councilman Price co-presented a motion instructing the LAPD to report its use of COMPSTAT – a tracking tool that gathers information of crime trends across the City. This motion is significant because there have been critics that claim the use of COMPSTAT promotes biased policing by rewarding officers for meeting enforcement quotas. The motion calls for looking into ways that COMPSTAT can be updated to ensure that it is being used to promote public safety while also ensuring equitable treatment, accountability, transparency, and community trust. Read the full motion here

Additionally, Councilman Price co-introduced a motion that requests information on how the LAPD will handle reports of misconduct by officers at the recent protests that called for justice for George Floyd who was killed by police in Minneapolis at the end of May. There have been numerous reports that many peaceful protesters were injured by tear gas, pepper spray, rubber bullets and other “less lethal” devices. The motion calls for LAPD to explain what disciplinary actions will be used against officers who were found to have used excessive force. Read the full motion here

Councilmember Price along with Councilmembers Wesson and Harris-Dawson introduced a motion instructing the LAPD to report on the resources needed to expand the Department’s Mental Evaluation Unit (MEU) and its System wide Mental Assessment Response Teams (SMART) in order to ensure officers can call these units when dealing with individuals with mental health issues. The motion is significant because there have been times where these resources are unavailable to officers in these situations. Read the full motion here

Councilmember Price introduced a resolution in support of AB 1196 (Gipson), which would make it illegal for any law enforcement officer within California to use a Carotid hold when subduing a suspect. This was the method officers used when interacting with George Floyd, who died as a result of this maneuver. Currently, the LAPD bans the use of this method; however it is important for this measure to be in place statewide. Read the full resolution here

 

Tuesday, June 2

On Tuesday, Councilman Curren Price this week introduced two motions dedicated to assisting small businesses and non-profits left behind by federal loans and other assistance in response to COVID-19. 

One proposal calls for an additional $30 million to replenish the city’s Small Business Emergency Loan Program. In March, Councilman Price advocated for $11 million in funding to create the program, which provides no-fee loans between $5,000 and $20,0000, with a zero percent interest rate and repayment deferred up to six months. As of May, the Economic & Workforce Development Department had received nearly 4,000 applications, showing the desperate need to serve as many local businesses that have had to endure closures, layoffs and loss of revenues. 

Councilman Price presented a second motion seeking the city's participation in the Los Angeles Regional COVID-19 Relief & Recovery Fund, which would provide loans and grants to small businesses, micro entrepreneurs and nonprofit organizations.

The relief and recovery fund would be a collaboration between the city, county, philanthropic organizations and financial institutions. It aims to assist businesses with fewer than 20 employees, many of which were shut out of federal loans. Recent data shows that currently more than half of the county is without a job due to COVID-19. The motion asks for a $4 million commitment by the city to launch the program. 

The two proposals will be reviewed next by the city’s new Ad Hoc Committee on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment, which Councilman Price is a member of. 

 

Wednesday, May 27

$100 Million COVID-19 Emergency Renters Relief Program

On Wednesday, Los Angeles City Council President Nury Martinez introduced a motion that allocates $100 million from the $700 million Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act to the City’s COVID-19 Emergency Renters Relief Program.

This action is an effort to continue to keep tenants in their homes, while also assisting property owners, during the COVID-19 pandemic. More information on the program, which is expected to launch by July 1, to come.

Rented Storage Units Protection

The Los Angeles City Council adopted an ordinance to provide temporary protection of self-service storage units during the COVID-19 pandemic. The ordinance allows renters of self-storage units to defer rent and other charges incurred for up to three months following the expiration of the local emergency period.

Renters must provide a statement in writing to the owners no later than seven days following the due date of the rent.

In addition, owners must provide a written notice regarding the temporary protection within 15 days of the ordinance’s adoption. Any owner who violates this ordinance is subject to an administrative citation.

Small Business Protections

The Los Angeles City Council adopted an ordinance based off a motion by Councilmember Bob Blumenfield and seconded by Councilman Curren Price that extends all expiring conditional use permits for a period of twelve months after expiration of the COVID-19 local emergency declaration.

The ordinance also suspends the requirement that a property owner or business provide additional parking in connection with a change of use in an existing structure. In addition, it suspends any condition requiring a property owner or business to provide off-site or valet parking, for a period of six months following the expiration of the local emergency ordinance.

COVID-19 Ad Hoc Committee

The Los Angeles City Council approved a motion to establish a new ad hoc committee of the Council related to COVID-19. The official name of the committee is the “Ad Hoc Committee on COVID-19 Recovery and Neighborhood Investment.” Among the members serving on the committee is Councilmember Curren Price.

The Committee will be tasked with numerous responsibilities including identifying health disparities, economic affects, and housing impacts of the COVID-19 crisis in key vulnerable communities. The committee will be responsible in ensuring the City receives its fair share of any State and Federal relief in order to meet the critical needs of residents and businesses, including economic recovery, stability, and growth for all Angelenos.

Resolution in Support

The Los Angeles City Council approved a motion relative to pursuing legal options to protect the rights of children and families excluded from the federal stimulus package. The motion also instructs the Chief Legislative Analyst to prepare a resolution in support of the Leave No Tax Payer Behind Act introduced by Congressmembers Lou Correa, Judy Chu, and Raul Grijalva.

 

Thursday, May 21

2020-2021 City Budget Moving Forward 

The Los Angeles City Council heard presentations from Mayor Eric Garcetti’s office, the Chief Legislative Analyst, and the City Administrative Officer regarding the state of the City’s budget for Fiscal Year 2020-2021. 

Taking an unconventional approach, the City Council allowed the Mayor’s proposed budget, which has a projected shortfall of more than $230 million and illustrates the devastating financial impact of COVID-19, to go forward and take effect July 1. 

The City’s Budget and Finance Committee will monitor the volatile effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and will consider amendments to the budget in June, with plans to make necessary adjustments on a quarterly basis. 

“We are in the middle of an emergency and we’re taking a flexible approach,” said Councilmember Curren Price, who serves on the City’s Budget and Finance Committee. “We will begin discussions again next month as we get more accurate numbers and a clearer picture on our finances. Currently, there are a lot of unknowns from when we reopen the economy, to how much federal aid the City receives, to how tourism and our local businesses look like post COVID-19.

“Things change from day to day, hour to hour. We just don’t have all the information yet.”

Dips in revenue from hotel tax, business tax, parking occupancy tax, sales tax, and utility user’s tax have contributed to this shortfall. In addition, more than $155 million has been drawn from the Reserve Fund, General Fund and various Special Funds to pay for COVID-19 expenditures such as testing, senior meals, shelter expansion, Project Roomkey (which provides hotels and motels for homeless individuals who are elderly or have medical conditions) and other assistance programs. However, these expenses are expected to be reimbursed from federally and some state funded dollars; though the exact amount or when is yet to be determined. 

In an attempt to make up the differences, the Mayor proposed cuts to various programs, furloughs for a majority of City employees, and a hiring freeze for the upcoming fiscal year. However, the budget emphasizes continued funding for key City resources such the Police and Fire department, homelessness cleanups and services, additional custodial services to maintain a safe working environment, as well as increased medical assistants in jails to mitigate the COVID-19 impacts. Cuts in services will include sidewalk repairs, tree services, graffiti abatement and others.

 

Wednesday, May 20

Capping Restaurant Delivery App Fees During COVID-19

The Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to support an amending motion co-presented by Councilmember Curren Price, to draft an ordinance that would limit the amount food delivery apps, such as Postmates, Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash, can charge restaurants during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The ordinance will prohibit third-party platform delivery companies from charging more than a 15 percent fee per order for providing delivery services to a restaurant, and more than a 5 percent fee per order for all other types of charges. In addition, it requires that 100 percent of the customer’s tip go to the delivery driver.

The ordinance, is expected to be transmitted next week for a special Economic Development Committee meeting on May 28 at 2 p.m. and go to Council the following week. If passed, the ordinance will remain in effect for 90 days after restaurants are allowed to resume on premises dining.

Reduced Vending Permit Fee Extended

The Los Angeles City Council passed a motion, authored by Councilman Curren Price, to extend the deadline for street vendors to apply for a vending permit at a reduced fee of $291 until July 1, 2021, or one year after the City’s “stay-at-home” order is lifted.

This came from the fact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a severe public health, social and economic impact on the City’s street vendors. This motion will amend the original ordinance that set the permit fees to $291 until July 1, 2020 and $541 on and after July 1, 2020.

 

Wednesday, May 13

Motion to Prevent Confiscation of Items

The Los Angeles City Council passed a motion that requests an Ordinance that prohibits the sale, disposal, donation or confiscation of personal belongings in rented storage units, if an individual’s storage lease goes into default as a direct result from the Coronavirus emergency.

Motion to Match Salaries of Deployed Military Service Members

The Los Angeles City Council passed a motion requesting the City Attorney, with assistance from the Personnel Department and the City Administrative Officer, to draft an Ordinance that ensures that all full-time City employees who are reactivated into military duties in response to the COVID-19 pandemic will receive the difference between their regular City salaries and their military salaries. The Ordinance will also ensure that these individuals continue to receive current City medical, dental, and life insurance program benefits for the duration of their military assignment. 

Restaurant Relief Program

The Los Angeles City Council passed a motion that would establish a restaurant relief program. The motion instructs the Economic and Workforce Development Department (EWDD), with assistance from the Chief Legislative Analyst and City Administrative Officer, to immediately develop a restaurant relief program that would allow local independent restaurants to temporarily contract with the City to provide meals to residents experiencing homelessness who reside in emergency shelters, seniors who were previously receiving meals delivered to their home and/or congregate meals at city dining centers, students who received meals or supplemental nutrition as part of a city-sponsored after-school program, the City’s first-responders, and City employees that are temporarily serving in a Disaster Service Worker capacity.

The motion also instructs the EWDD, with assistance from other departments, to identify any short-term options to improve restaurant and local food chain operations, and offer any remedies to reduce costs and impacts, such as abatement of the City’s business taxes, a waiver of fees including the suspension of permitting fees for change of use, among others, when necessary. 

LADWP Relief Program

The Los Angeles City Council approved a motion that expands the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) Low Income Discount Program and Lifeline Program to include customers financially affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The motion requests that the LADWP immediately report to the Council the feasibility of expanding the Lifeline Program to include COVID-19 hardship as a qualifying criteria, or the creation of a new reduced rate program for its low-income customers who have been financially affected by the COVID-19 disease. The motion was seconded by Councilmember Price and authored by Councilwoman Martinez. 

Resolutions in Support

The City Council passed four motions in support of state and/or federal legislation.

The first established the City’s position in support of legislation that would amend the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act to provide $500 recovery rebates for children born in 2020.

The second established the City’s position in support of any legislation and/or administrative action to address the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on society to provide funds supporting state and local governments; increase Federal Medical Assistance Percentages to provide greater healthcare coverage; provide funds for education; expand health coverage for government employees; and create an infectious disease standards to protect frontline workers. This resolution was seconded by Councilmember Price.

The third resolution established the City’s position in support of any legislation or administrative action that would provide additional assistance and support for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), including the proposed Closing the Meal Gap Act of 2020. The resolution also included the City’s position in support of any legislation that would make critical improvements to SNAP, including boosting the maximum benefit by 15 percent, increasing the minimum benefit to $30 per month, and suspending rule changes to SNAP until the economy has fully recovered.

Finally, two resolutions established the City’s position in support of HR 908 (Meng) and Senate Resolution (Harris-Duckworth-Hirono), condemning all forms of anti-Asian sentiment as related to COVID-19, which would recommit U.S. leadership to prioritize language access and exclusivity in communication practices, combat misinformation and discrimination that put Asian Americans at risk. Councilmember Price seconded the second of the two resolutions.

 

Tuesday, May 12

Helping Survivors of Domestic Violence and Human Trafficking

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles City Council passed a motion by Councilmember Price that would allocate $810,000 in emergency assistance to 1,000 vulnerable dislocated workers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The new emergency funding will specifically help survivors of domestic violence and human trafficking victims in Los Angeles. 

The financial assistance will be distributed through the City’s 16 WorkSource Centers and LA RISE providers and can be used to offset costs for housing, food, utilities, childcare, transportation and any other emergency support services during the public health crisis. In addition to the support services, EWDD will make sure these survivors are eligible for Unemployment Insurance and ensure they receive their stimulus checks. 

 

Wednesday, April 29

The Los Angeles City Council met on Wednesday to address a slew of COVID-19 related issues. For the immediate future, the City Council will meet virtually on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 10 a.m., beginning the week of May 4, 2020. It will be broadcast live on Channel 35 and on Facebook @CurrenDPriceJr.

Among the actions on Wednesday were:

Right of Recall Ordinance

The City Council passed a Right of Recall ordinance for workers affected by COVID-19. The workers protected under this ordinance include airport employees, hotel employees, janitorial staff, maintenance staff, as well as security service staff. Laid off workers in these sectors who qualify are those who were laid off on or after March 4 due to lack of business as a result of COVID-19. 

Laid off workers will be given an opportunity to resume employment with their respective companies based off of time of service with their employer. Workers shall be given a minimum of five days to respond to the offer. In addition, the City Council passed a joint ordinance ensuring that in the event that an employer transfers ownership to another party, the eligible workers will still have the same opportunity to be rehired by the company. This ordinance applies to any change or control of ownership occurring within two years following the declaration of the emergency from COVID-19.

Protections for Commercial Tenants

The City Council is looking into whether to extend the time commercial tenants have to repay any back due rent following the expiration of the local emergency. Landlords cannot evict a commercial tenant who is unable to pay rent due to a loss of income related to COVID-19, and businesses have three months after the emergency is lifted to pay back rents.

The Council requested a report back from the appropriate departments to determine the proper time frame for businesses to pay their rent back to prevent larger businesses from taking advantage of the small business loophole.

Exploring Opportunity to use Federal Stimulus Funds for Job Creation

The City Council passed a motion authored by Council President Nury Martinez and seconded by Councilmembers Curren Price and Herb Wesson to instruct multiple City departments to draft a report on coordinating a plan to utilize the federal stimulus funds to develop a job creation program prioritizing economic aid to frontline communities. The intention of the motion is to protect workers and communities, and not corporate executives. The motion also instructs the City to put a down payment to encourage a regenerative economy in hopes that an economic crisis can be prevented in the future. 

Los Angeles Housing+Community Investment Department (HCIDLA) Notification

The City Council unanimously passed a motion by Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell instructing the Los Angeles Housing+Community Investment Department (HCIDLA) to notify by mail all property owners and renters of the new provisions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Within the letter, renters and property owners will be notified of the right that renters will have, stating that they will have 12 months to pay past due rent following the end of the local emergency order caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

In addition, the letter will include a notification to property owners notifying them of the Federal and State provisions that have been put in place to prevent foreclosures and evictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

 

Community Calendar Report a Neighborhood Issue Business Resource Center